Posted on

The Murano is certainly comfy, but that’s about all it can boast about

Hello Baraza,
I love cars and they must be fast, but in Kenya they have put in place speed bumps, Alcoblow and what have you to stop us. Kindly give me the lowdown on the Nissan Murano; is it as good as its curves imply or is it “just another Nissan”?
Eriq B

The speed bumps and Alcoblow kits are necessary evils to protect Kenyans from themselves. Sometimes we take things too far, more often than not, with blatant disregard for existing dogma.

Rules are meant to be followed, and if the great unwashed thinks it knows better and is too large to capture (“They can’t arrest us all!”), systems can be put in place that make strict obeisance of such tenets unavoidable.

With speed bumps looming ahead, pushing the needle to previously unused sectors of the speedometer doesn’t look so attractive now, does it?

With a policeman in a high-visibility jacket ready and willing to ruin your weekend with a citation and court appointment (wherein penalties involving large sums of money and/or extended periods as a guest of the state will be on the menu), drink-driving is suddenly not as much fun as it used to be, is it?

NOT EASY ON FUEL

That aside, let us chat (very briefly) about the Murano. It is a good car if you buy it — if it wasn’t, you wouldn’t want to admit to anyone that you threw money down the toilet buying a useless vehicle, would you? It is a good car only if you own it, because it is an investment.

As an unsold car, it is hard to see the point of a Murano other than as a cut-price pose-mobile; an option where the Mercedes M Class looks too snobbish, a BMW X5/X6/X3 too expensive, a Lexus RX330/450h too cliché, a Subaru Tribeca too close to guilt by association with the boy-racer WRX, and where the propagator of the incipient purchase has a fetish for chrome.

It looks like an SUV but it won’t seat seven and will be flummoxed by some rough stuff that a Freelander could handle: the ground clearance is insufficient for tough terrain; the 4WD system is not for anything besides good traction on wet tarmac and/or a light coating of mud on hard-pack road; approach, departure and break-over angles are not ideal for crawling over anything tougher than a kerb; it is not easy on fuel and, to make matters worse, there is a pretender in the line-up: a little-known 2.5 litre 4-cylinder engine that could easily haunt your engine bay, fooling the unwise into thinking they have the more famous 3.5 litre V6 (“sports car engine, mate! Straight off the 350Z!”); that is, until the day they go beyond the psychological barrier that is half-throttle and experience incredulity at being dusted by a sports saloon with high-lift cams, then ask themselves what all those cubic inches are for if the Murano can’t keep up with a tiny car.

Cross-over utilities are pointless in my opinion, and the Murano is one of them. More style than substance, more form than function, more panache than purpose. It is comfortable, though, and makes a good kerb-crawler and school run vehicle…

—————————————————————————————–

Hi Baraza,
First, I wish to appreciate your column in the Daily Nation. I have a Land Rover Discovery 3, 2007,  2.7 diesel engine and am thinking of customising it. What I have in mind is to make it a twin turbo or add a supercharger to increase horsepower.

It’s a big project and I know it will incur significant costs; buying the turbo or supercharger itself is not cheap. Anyway, I wish to get your opinion as to whether this is not a very crazy undertaking.

And while at it, please tell me where I can get aftermarket parts in Kenya such as cold intakes and performance exhaust manifolds and any other ways to add those horses. I know this is not a race car and I don’t expect it to be, but boys will be boys, always competing to see who has the most power.
PS: I don’t think the Evo will ever see the tail lights of a Sub.
Kevin

Yes, it is a crazy undertaking. To begin with, nobody ever supercharges a diesel engine (the explanation is long and highly technical).

The other impediment is creating a twin-turbo set-up from a single turbo application. Will the twin turbo be sequential or parallel? Where will you fit the second turbo?

The Disco’s engine bay is already cramped enough as it is. It would be easier to either replace the factory turbo with an aftermarket unit, or simply increase the boost pressure in the current one.

Recent happenings in the Great Run (last year’s 4×4) indicate that the Disco 3’s turbo might not be the most faithful accomplice in attaining horsepower.

The one Discovery that took part blew its (stock) turbo or something along those lines — after limping along in safe-mode for a while. Maybe fiddling with the turbo on the Ford AJD-V6/PSADT17 engine might not be a good idea after all.

Buying a new turbo might not be your biggest headache in this undertaking. You might or might not need new injectors (high-flow units), depending on what comes as stock from the factory. You might or might not need an intercooler upgrade.

You will definitely need new headers and a new intake. You will also need either a new engine map for the ECU to gel with the new blower or a whole new ECU altogether. I don’t know of any local outfit that does Discovery engine maps.

Worse still, opening up the engine might prove to be the first obstacle you come across: some engines are built and held together using custom covers and fasteners, whose tools are very specific and supplied only to official dealers. I hardly think RMA Kenya will want to get in on this.

The easiest way to get a sizeable jump in power might be to simply increase boost in the current turbo by a very huge factor, then persevere the gnawing feeling in your stomach that soon, the turbo will most likely disintegrate into a cloud of metal shavings.

Shop around. Performance parts are not very hard to come by nowadays. PS: You are right. You will never see the tail lights of a car that is behind you.

———————————

Dear Baraza,

I enjoy reading your articles and appreciate and respect your advice. Now, please give your comments on the performances of the Nissan Pathfinder, the Toyota Fortuner and the Land Rover Discovery.

I test-drove a Pathfinder and the car seemed excellent… power, comfort, and smoothness. Road grip at high speed on rough roads with what they call independent wheel suspension was very good compared to the others.

However, it has a lower power rating of only 2.5L. Or is there higher output for some cars even with a lower cc? Please advise because I need to make a decision. Mash.

Hello Mash,
I don’t follow. First, in Point 1 you say you like the power, comfort and smoothness of the Pathfinder, but then come Point 2, you complain that the vehicle is down on power. Which is which?

You are right, though, the Pathfinder is good on those three fronts, but even better is the Discovery, again on all three fronts. This leads to another question: which Discovery are you referring to?

We are on the fourth iteration, which is a whole lot different (and light years better) than the first two generations. This also applies to the Pathfinder: which generation are we talking about?

The earlier ones were close to hopeless, but the latest ones (R51 model onwards) are superb. Not so much the Fortuner.

The power might be much lower than the Pathfinder, especially where the diesel engines in the Hilux are concerned (101hp for the Toyota 2KD-FTV 2.5 litre compared to the Nissan’s 170hp YD25TT 2.5 litre diesel).

A BIT THIRSTY

The Fortuner is also not what we would call comfortable, and being based on a rugged, near-immortal, steel-boned, hewn-from-granite frame designed to do all sorts of menial tasks, from ferrying khat to carrying bags of cement to toting heavy artillery in war-torn areas, smoothness was not a priority during development, and it shows. It is based on a truck of sorts, and it feels like a truck of sorts.

Taking you at your word (verbatim), for the Pathfinder, you will not find a smaller engine than the 2.5, and by induction, it will not be more powerful because it does not exist in the first place.

However, bigger engines are available: you could get a 3.0 V6 turbodiesel making 240hp (only with the 2010 facelift model, though), 4.0 V6 petrol (good unit, this, but a bit thirsty) good for 266hp; or even a rare 5.6 litre V8, though this particular one might be available only in the Middle East.

————————————

Dear Baraza,
I have one issue after another with my BMW E46 and all the diagnoses are misleading. I used to take my car to a local dealer but they were not of much help. What you should tell the BMW guys in Germany is that either we don’t have serious dealers or expertise in Kenya, or their machines are no longer exciting or trustworthy. One can sleep in the bush any time.
Harrison.

This should make things interesting, especially seeing what I wrote about BMW last week. Let us see if Bavaria follows this up. However, I agree with you: we don’t get exciting BMWs here, at least not via official channels.

No convertibles — although I did see one or two coupés at Bavaria Motors some time back — none of the M Cars (more so the mighty M5), and I can bet the futuristic i8 model that is rumoured to be on the premises is not for sale to the public just yet.

————————————

Hi JM,
Thank you for your very informative column.
1. I recently witnessed an ambulance tear through the side of a saloon car and speed off, leaving the saloon driver gaping. The saloon car was in a traffic jam and could not climb the kerb to give way because of the posts on the side of the road.

(a) Do ambulance drivers have immunity from prosecution? To what extent are they exempted from obeying traffic rules?
(b) What course of action could the saloon car driver have taken under the circumstances?
(c) Are Cabinet and Principal Secretaries allowed by law to use the wrong lane on a dualcarriageway? I find it very dangerous to oncoming vehicles.

2. Which is the best buy between the Toyotas Spacio, Allion, Belta and NZE in terms of engineering quality and maintenance?
Thanks.

This is new…
1. a) I believe drivers of emergency vehicles enjoy a certain degree of immunity from prosecution, but a number of factors have to be in place first, chief being there has to be an emergency.

I have also witnessed an ambulance make short work of the front nearside fender of a saloon car whose only mistake was to peep a little too far into a T-junction, across which the ambulance was barrelling at full tilt, lights flashing and siren wailing.

Upon inquiry, I was told that the saloon car driver had no case; if anything, he was in danger of prosecution for failing to make way for an emergency vehicle. I am not sure to what extent this immunity stretches.

b) Typical accident scenario: step 1 is to assess the damage (and pray that you do not need an ambulance too… and/or a hearse). Step 2 is to contact your insurance company. They will know and advise you what the next course of action is.

Reporting this to the police might get you into deeper trouble (see the conclusion of (a) above), but I believe that at one point or other an accident report will have to be made.

c) I don’t think so. Very few people have this privilege, the President being the most obvious example, but Secretaries? I hardly think so.

2. These cars all come from the same company, so they will be built similarly. The level of quality and engineering precision will be reflected directly on the cost of the car: expect the Belta to be slightly inferior to the other three, which all feel the same.

Maintenance follows the same formula: the simplistic Belta should be easier to run and repair compared to the remaining trio.

Posted on

Toyota RunX beats the Spacio and Peugeot 206 hands down

Hi Baraza,

I am a regular reader of your column and I must say I appreciate your work, even though I don’t own a car yet.

However, I am looking to buy my first car, and I have in my sights a Toyota RunX/Allex, Toyota Spacio and a Peugeot 206.

Please advice me on the best buy between these three in terms of durability, availability and cost of spare parts, maintenance (frequency of breakdowns given that I will be a very careful driver), fuel consumption, off-road capability, ease of handling, and resale value.

Thanks and God bless,

Wanjiru.

Thank you for the compliment. I am always glad to help where I can. On to the three cars you ask about:

Durability: The Runx/Allex is best. It is basically a Corolla with the boot chopped off, and we all know that Corollas run tirelessly.

Only a really abusive ownership will ever bog down a Corolla. The Spacio is not so good on longevity. I have seen several lose shape quite badly after only a few months’ use on Kenyan roads. It does not seem like a solid car.

Even worse, by sheer power of reputation, is the little Peugeot. Nobody uses the words “durability” and “Peugeot” in the same sentence, unless one is telling a joke.

This I know from experience (I owned a 405 for a while) and from observation. I once did an article on Peugeots, and I remember saying acquiring ownership of a Peugeot is like getting into a relationship with someone you met at the bar. It is very exciting, but there is no knowing where it will lead to.

Availability and costs of spare parts: Spares are there for all these cars, but the Toyotas will have cheaper ones than the Peugeot.

The clutch of my 405 cost me Sh14,000 to replace, and that was three years ago. Compare to the then cost of Sh3,000 for the same job on a Corolla 110.

Maintenance: The Peugeot will frustrate you, let me be honest. The RunX, like I said, is a Corolla, which never breaks down unless you force it to.

Fuel consumption: Buy a 206 diesel and discover the joys of 25 kpl-plus motoring. Briefly. That is, until the DPF (diesel particulate filter) gets choked by mud and/or the little turbo over-spins at high altitude and fails.

The RunX will hover around 12-15 kpl, more if you drive like a lady (pun intended). The Spacio will give slightly worse economy than the RunX.

Off-road capability: None of the above, least of all the Spacio, with its long wheelbase and minimal ground clearance. How many times must I tell you people to use appropriate cars for specific activities?

Handling: The 206 has the sweetest handling of the three cars you mention, especially if you opt for the GTI. The RunX is a close second, losing out only because there is less “feel”, or driver engagement.

The Spacio looks like a small van, and handles like one. Don’t try to get on its door handles through tight corners, because it WILL get on its door handles.

Resale: You will grow old and die trying to transfer the Peugeot’s problems to someone else.

The Spacio will not exactly fly off the shelf either, but it will not gather as much dust as the Peugeot before getting a new owner.

The RunX is pretty popular: someone might even make you an offer while sitting in traffic; that is how much Kenyans love them. Kenyan ladies, to be exact: I know a few women here and there who drive a RunX. Join the pack.

Dear Baraza,

I am writing for advice on the cooling system of my 1987 short-wheelbase Toyota Landcruiser.

I’ve had it for one year now and bought it without an engine and gearbox. I installed what I was told was the ‘original’ engine, the 2H. While the radiator is large and the fan as large as can fit within the available space, the vehicle overheats when driving up steep hills slowly.

I’ve had the radiator flushed, coolant added, and the fan is working. Also, if the car is idling in traffic I do not have a problem with overheating. This suggests that the cooling system is just not efficient enough.

Could this be the case, or could something else be wrong? I had a similar problem with a previous vehicle and the fundi told me the fan was spinning too slowly, tightened something to increase the speed and I never had a problem again.

Would this help?  Another suggestion I’ve had is to add a fan guard to better channel the air to cool the engine. I’m reluctant to try this as it seems yet another expense without sufficient promise of solving the problem. Could you please advise?
Cheers,

Darcy Ogada

The capacity of the current cooling system may be inadequate to counter the 2H engine’s thermal output. Either that or the car is running lean under power, which causes heating problems (and may even damage the exhaust valves).

For the first cause, a bigger fan may help, as may a fan guard. Some people go the extra mile and upgrade the entire system, fitting bigger/auxiliary radiators, fatter hoses and high-capacity water pumps, but this is costly.

Before diving into extra expenditure, first ensure the following:

1. The radiator core is clean

2. The radiator screen is clean

3. Side panels have nuts at the bottom

4. The water/antifreeze ratio is right (typically 50:50)

5. There are no blockages in the cooling system hoses/water jackets.

Check the timing also, and the valve tappet clearance.

Hi Baraza

I have an Opel Astra 1.4 1996 model. I’ve driven it for 10 years and it has given me excellent service.

Benta, for that is her name, still looks good, drives fast, handles well, is solid… and strong. An excellent, extremely reliable ride.

In the last six months, though, I’ve been to the mechanic more times than in the 10 years combined. My question: Is my car just old, has the mechanic lost the plot, or is it a combination of both?

(It’s the same mechanic I’ve used all along and though he’s been super in the past, he has employed many young men who may not have the same thorough training he obviously had)

Lately, when the car goes to the shop it is fixed for one thing but leaves with another problem, usually small, but still a problem. So, is this the signal that I should start looking for another car? Or should I hang in there, get all her little problems fixed and move on with her for another 10 years?

If you think I should move on (sob!), what car would you recommend that is just as strong and fuss-free as my girl has been? I live in a place where there is no road, so this new car has to be solid enough to handle that, be fuel-efficient, look good, and not attract thieves

Thanks for your help,

Judy.

Benta, eh? Prejudices are like foreheads, everybody has one; and some are bigger than others.

I have one concerning people who name their cars and call them “she” and “her”. Don’t let that stop you though; the good thing with prejudices is that they are almost always unfounded.

Anyway, back to the matter at hand. I wish you were more specific about the little problems you mention. How bad is the frequency with which you keep returning to your mechanic? And what does he say?

A 10-year-old car is still serviceable and should easily give you another six years of painless ownership, unless you bought the car second-hand, in which case it may be time to lay Benta to rest (or palm her off to someone else to struggle with).

If you don’t mind buying a second-hand car, stay German. An ex-Mashariki E39 BMW 520 should cover most of these bases. Or you could look farther back and get a W124 E200 (or 200E) Mercedes. From Japan, the ideal car would be a Toyota Corolla, or even a Camry, but a locally sold, fully tropicalised unit. The problem is, it might get stolen.

Generally, any locally sold saloon with an engine of 2.4 litres or smaller will serve your purpose. Just don’t buy an Alfa though… Car & General sold a few units some years back and keeping one on the road will be a hard lesson you will not easily forget.

Hi Baraza,

I own a 1997 Toyota Premio that has served me well. Recently it has developed two problems.

First, when the gear lever in on neutral or parking, the idling is high at about 1200rpm and the engine is rather noisy. I have checked with my mechanic and he pointed out that the problem was with the throttle and opened it up and cleaned with WD40. However, the problem still persists.

Second, in the morning the steering wheel is difficult to turn but softens after a short drive. I replaced the automatic transmission oil pump but the problem still persists. Kindly advise what could be wrong.

Regards,

Macharia.

That high-rev idling: when does it occur? If it is only on start-up, then that is normal, the engine is warming up. If it happens all the time, check your Idle Air Control valve. There could also be a vacuum leak at the intake manifold or at the vacuum hose.

For the hard steering: your PAS fluid could be low, or the pump is taking too long to work. Check the fluid levels first, then the pump. Does the car make a screeching noise when you turn the steering? If so, then the fan belt is not sitting true within the pulley of the power steering pump.

Hi Baraza,

Kindly talk about Korean cars, specifically the Hyundai Accent.

I own a 1996 model and it has never disappointed me. The fuel efficiency is more than excellent (at 19 kilometres per litre). Of late I have seen many Hyundai minibuses plying the Embakasi route, could it be a sign of Kenyans realising that they have colonised their minds for too long with Japanese models and ignored better alternatives?

Give people time, they will realise how good Hyundai cars have now become.

Once upon a time they were close to rubbish (if not actually rubbish), and they stayed above water by building and rebadging obsolete vehicle models.

Then they tried their hand at making their own cars (also bottom-rung stuff). Now they build their cars in a way convincing enough for the American market to sit up and pay attention. Maybe it is about time we did too.

Hi Baraza,

1. Ever since Toyota changed their double-cabin pick-up, why are Volkswagen and Ford copying the look? And who told Volkswagen to venture into that pick-up field yet it’s not their thing? I know Ford has a history with the Ranger, but why copy the Toyota look?

2. Now that the ‘freno’ is always on heavy commercial vehicles, how come I have heard it on some Subaru? What purpose does it serve in both cases, and how come in some vehicles its auto while some are manual?

Regards,

Brian.

1. The VW pickup you deride here is actually quite a machine, and it rocked the double-cab world at launch. It is not as hopeless as you may suspect. As for Ford and VW “copying” the Hilux look: well, that is your opinion.

In my view they took completely different design routes. The VW has a blocky, butch, almost square design, the Hilux is swoopy and curvy while the Ford is Amero-centric: big toothy grille, plenty of chrome, oversize with a simplified execution, though not as simplified as that of the Amarok.

2. What you heard in the Subaru cars was not an exhaust brake (so-called ‘freno’), it is called a BOV (blow-off valve/dump valve), and it is used to prevent compressor surge (air rushing the wrong way up the turbo) when the throttle is closed (the compressed air is trapped between the closed throttle plate and the turbo fan blades, and starts depressurising backwards into the turbo, causing the turbo to slow down suddenly).

Automatic and manual exhaust brakes depend on the manufacturer’s wishes. I know the exhaust brakes on Scanias are integrated into the foot brake (they also have a separate engine brake and retarder).

On most other trucks/buses it is manually activated using a lever/stalk on the steering column. However, deactivation may be manual (pull/push the stalk back into its original position) or automatic (the exhaust brake is deactivated automatically whenever the accelerator or clutch pedals are touched).

The exhaust brake is used in HCVs to slow down without having to use the foot brake. This reduces wear and tear on the wheel brakes, and is especially handy at high speed where there is a real risk of burning out the wheel brakes due to vehicle momentum.

Hi Baraza,

Great work with the column. I know it is specified ‘car trouble’, but I have a question on motorsports in Kenya. Which categories are there? Which is the easiest (read cheapest) way to join the industry, assuming all I have is the passion and a little money?

Under KMSF, I know of the rally circuit and karting competitions, especially in Mombasa. There are also buggy races (I don’t know the exact name of that race series).

Then there is the Concours D’Elegance (yes, believe it). I doubt if the Rhino Charge falls under the aegis of KMSF.

Outside of KMSF we have the Great Run (sic!). It is not competitive, but hey, you get numbers and stickers on your car. And it is cheap to take part in.

You don’t even need a specialised vehicle, your own daily runabout will serve the purpose quite well.

Let me get a more comprehensive answer from KMSF then I will get back to you with it…

Posted on

Mark II, Verossa, Mark X and Camry: Same stuff

Hello Baraza,

I own a Toyota Premio, year 2000 model, and would like to upgrade to a Camry or Mark X. I do not do a lot of out-of-town driving — maybe three times a year to western Kenya and five times to Nakuru — so I need the cars mostly for town service.

I expect to get power and comfort from the car I buy. I want to do 160KPH comfortably on the Narok-Bomet road but still not feel like I am pushing the engine too hard.

So, between the two, which is better in terms of performance, reliability, durability, and maintenance, and which would you recommend?

Martin.

Those two, along with the Mark II and the Verossa, are what we call “sister cars”, offering similar amenities on similar platforms with one or two differences here and there.

It is in this vein that the question goes back to you: do you prefer a front-wheel drive car (Toyota Camry) or a rear-wheel drive one (Mark X)? The Mark X also has the option of 4WD, the Camry does not. Otherwise they are similar in so many other ways.

Hello Baraza,

Thank you for your continued assistance in car reviews and advice. I have been searching for a low-priced car and the Suzuki Aerio has caught my eye.

The car looks good from the outside and the price is within my range. Following your advice that there may be better deals out there other than the conventional brands, I am tempted to risk buying this machine, only that I would highly appreciate your views on it beforehand.

It is almost the size of a Subaru Forester, and is a 1.5-litre two-wheel-drive (year 2005), so fuel consumption might not be an issue here.

My concern is availability of spare parts for this particular model because, unless I am wrong, it is a very rare piece. Also, is it reliable, though my use is the normal home-to-office run and an up-country visit over the weekend. In a nutshell, would it be suitable for a first-time car owner?

Regards,

Njomo JM

The Aerio has been accused of blandness in other markets, and from what I have seen, the estate version looks remarkably similar to a Toyota Spacio (another bland car).

Reliability does not seem problematic, nor is fuel economy, and in these days of the Internet, availability of spares is directly proportional to how badly you want a particular type of car.

Hi Baraza,

I am basically what you can refer to as a sufferer who loves speed and performance. In a profession which places a premium on appearances, and with a budget of between Sh600,000 and Sh700,000, I have my mind set on a Mercedes-Benz C Class, W202 or an E W124.

I, however, would like to get your two cents’ worth on maintenance, fuel consumption, and reliability of the two, bearing in mind that both have been used on Kenyan roads for over 10 years. In other words, which of the two would be a better buy?

Henry.

If keeping up appearances is a priority to you, then the three points you raise there are moot. Ask owners or drivers of the Range Rover P38A (what we use to call the “House”, the old 4.6 HSE) what I mean.

Ignore the tears streaming down their faces as they recall their ownership experiences and listen keenly to what they have to say as regards reliability, consumption, and maintenance.

In terms of common sense, the W202 wins on economy. Maintenance could also swing the 202 way because of the bigger service intervals. Reliability might favour the 124: those things simply do not break down.

Appearances turn the tables around. The 124 is a bigger car and looks more menacing. The 202 could be accused of looking a bit “lady-like”, and I know of people who consider the C Class as a beginner’s Benz (before the A Class was invented).

Hello,

Thanks for the great work you do. Yours is a very interesting read. I like your way with words; even novices can understand what you are talking about.

I own a Toyota Sprinter AE 114, manual transmission, full time 4WD. I have had problems with wheel alignment for a long time. Several mechanics have told me the alignment bushes on the arm have collapsed, and Toyota Kenya does not have the spares in stock.

Driving, even on a level highway, is a nightmare because I have to wrestle with the steering wheel. What can I do to remedy this?

Tiony AK.

I did not think I would ever say this to a reader, but it may be time for you to head “downtown” towards the infamous Kirinyaga Road. If the part is out of stock at Toyota Kenya, you might be lucky along that seedy avenue where cars are chopped and stripped of parts.

If I could find the fourth gear synchroniser unit for a manual transmission 1990 Peugeot 405 there, I am sure the steering system bushes of a more recent Toyota car can be found too.

Hello Baraza,

I bought a Toyota NZE 121, year 2005 model recently and there are two knobs that are confusing me. First, what is the work of the ‘Shift Lock’ button at the gear console?

And, second, on the gear lever are two knobs. What is the work of the smaller one? Please enlighten me because I have never touched them. The car is light, very fast, and pocket friendly. Kind regards,
JMM.

The ‘Shift Lock’ button, when pressed, allows the driver to change from ‘Park’ to ‘Neutral’ when the engine is off. You may have noticed that the gear lever will not move at all if the vehicle is off, and that might make towing a problem.

Now to the two buttons. The bigger one must be the one which is pressed when one of these is selected; ‘Park’ or ‘Reverse’.

This is a fail-safe feature to prevent the erroneous engagement of either of these selector positions, which would be detrimental to the gearbox if the vehicle is in forward motion. When pressed, at least that way the driver is sure of what he is doing.

The smaller button must be the ‘Overdrive’ switch. Keep the overdrive on, unless you are towing another vehicle or pulling a heavy load, in which case you can turn it off.

Hi Baraza,

We appreciate your help on motoring.

1. Recent high performance engines run best on high-octane fuels. What kind of fuel do Formula One monsters run on?

2. Does the same apply to super bikes?

3. What type of engine oil, transmission oil and lubricants do they use?

4. Could you demystify these Formula One cars for us?

Thank you,

Chris MM.

1. Formula One cars run on high octane fuels, as you may have already suspected.

2. Up to a point, yes. Though bikes can easily run on lower octane stuff without much risk of blowing an engine or pre-ignition.

3. F1 cars mostly use synthetic oils of the high performance variety. Stuff like Shell Helix (Ferrari) and Mobil 1 (McLaren, Mercedes).

4. Yes, it would be possible to demystify these things, but you see, I would need insider information, which is a closely guarded secret. The inner workings of naturally aspirated 2.4-litre engine making 750hp is not something that is out there in the public.

All I know is that the power comes from the ability of those engines to rev to 15,000rpm or more, but that ability is what is kept mysterious to us lesser mortals. That is why you will never see a detailed photograph of anybody’s F1 engine: even mundane details like bolts sizes are kept away from the prying eye.

Dear Baraza,

I recently bought a Toyota Belta, 996cc engine, type 1KR-FE. The car is very nice for town service and fuel economy. A few questions though:

1: The engine vibrates a lot, especially at idling or when caught up in traffic and the air con is on. I have changed the plugs to manufacturer’s specs but there is no change. Is this vibration normal?

2: The ‘Check Engine’ and ‘ABS’ lights came on a while back and diagnosis has returned accelerator and front wheel ABS sensors. However, the parts are not available in Kenya and the local franchise is hopeless. Where can I get these?

3: What is the standard fuel consumption for this car? On the Net, some sites indicate 15KPL in town and 18KPL on the highway, while others talk of 12KPL in town and 15 on the open road. Mine consumes 11.5KPL in town and 15 on the highway.

Ken.

1. Vibration: It depends. How bad is the effect? It could be that the water pump/fan and/or the air-con are placing a huge load on the engine. Remember 996cc is not much to play with, so even a small peripheral accessory could have a significant effect on engine load. I once had a Toyota Starlet, EP82, 1300cc, and at night, when idling, if I put on the headlamps, I noticed the idling would change: the revs would dip slightly.

2. Buying sensors: You could always try the Internet. Search for the parts yourself or join a forum. There are always people selling stuff on those forums. If not, there might be someone with a car similar to yours who knows where to source these items.

3. Fuel economy: There is not such a thing as “exact fuel consumption”. The economy figure is highly dependent on several factors: Driving style. Driving environment (being stuck in traffic for three hours, for instance).

Gross Vehicle Weight. Aerodynamic profile. How much air-con is used. The figures quoted are a guideline; they are not set in stone. Different people will achieve different economy figures. Expect 12KPL in town and 15 on highway.

Hello,

I am looking for a vehicle, either a Toyota Corolla station wagon or a Nissan Wingroad. Please advise me on the following:

1: The resale value of each.

2: Which one can best withstand rough terrain?

3: Maintenance costs of each.

4: Availability of spare parts and their cost.

5: Is an automatic transmission as good as manual one, especially in old cars?

Finally, everyone in the rural areas is rushing for the Toyota Probox. What is so special about this car compared to other Toyota station wagons?

Thanks,

Lincoln S Njue.

1. Wingroads tend to age badly, so they do not hold their value well.

2. From 1 above, the Toyota could be a safer bet.

3. Sundry parts are the same: things like wiper blades, brake pads, oil… Model-specific spare parts should also not have too big a disparity in cost between the two cars.

4. See 3 above.

5. The automatic gearboxes in old cars were not too good. And manual transmissions offer better economy and accord the driver more control.

The Probox’s popularity comes from its cheapness and load capacity. Best in class.

Hello,

Thanks for your informative articles on cars. I always look forward to reading them. I drive a 2003 Subaru Legacy BL5, 2.0GT spec B, auto-manual that I would like to do Stage 2 tuning on. Where can I get such services in Nairobi?

Also, I changed my short block EJ20 and my car increased fuel consumption from 9.8KPL to 6.0KPL. Needless to say, I am suffering at the petrol pump. Even though my mechanic says most Subarus do 6.5KPL, what is the best solution to regain my 9.8KPL?

Regards,

Robertson Amalemba Lumasi.

I know of two places where you can get your car modified to Stage 2 level: Auto Art K Ltd, run by The Paji (Amir Mohamed), located behind Total Petrol Station, Gilgil Road, Industrial Area, and Unity Auto Garage, run by a man called Asjad, just a few metres away along Kampala Road.

To regain your previous economy figures, the simple straight answer is to revert to your old EJ20 engine. I do not know what you changed it to, so I cannot tell what exactly led to your high consumption.

What I can tell you is this: if fuel economy is a pain right now, you will be in tears once your car gets to Stage 2 status. Those things can be very thirsty, especially when thrashed.