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Hondas are fine cars that attract insultingly low resale prices

In regards to the Honda Accord and Honda CRV, they are both good cars, but my friends advised me against them citing poor resale value.

Is this true? If yes, which is the better option with a better resale value? How about the Toyota Camry? Does it have good resale value like other Toyota vehicles because of “perception”.

Kindly comment on reliability, fuel economy, safety, and performance as compared to Honda Accord. Remember, I am looking for a used family car.

Ambrose.

There might be a grain of truth in the allegations of Honda vehicles not having strong resale characteristics in the Kenyan automotive field, but those who “Think Toyota, Today, and Tomorrow Too” have no idea what they are missing out on. Hondas are good cars, especially those equipped with V-TEC.

The Camry might suffer the Accord’s resale fate for a very different reason. A good number of Kenyans are “scared” of engines that stretch beyond 1800cc. Those that are indifferent will not be buying a Camry; they will go for something less plain and boring.

So that will be jumping from a lion’s cage in the zoo only to realise that you have now landed in the tiger’s cage. No difference in circumstances.

The parameters that you mention are more or less the same for the two cars, but from what I observed, the Accord may have the edge in performance over the Camry. If in doubt, you could always go for the Accord R, which has…. wait for it… a 2.2 litre V-TEC engine, good for almost 220hp.

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Hi Baraza,

Thank you for a good job done so far. A quick challenge of sorts, though. Have you ever done motorcycle reviews? If not, then how about it? An ideal place to begin would be the now Popular TVS Apache.

Nicholas Ngetah.

Thank you for the compliments, and no, I have not done any motorcycle reviews. This is chiefly because I do not want to die, and riding a motorcycle greatly increases the odds of that happening. So, borrowing from the sheep in George Orwell’s Animal Farm: “Four wheels good, two wheels bad.”

I do, however, have a colleague who does not give much thought to the vagaries of the afterlife, and as such he loves motorcycles. I am talking about The Jaw. Maybe he could ride them, review them, then he and I see how I can put that review into my own words. Fair, Nicholas?

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Dear Baraza,

I am the second owner of a P38 4.6HSE 1998 Range Rover. It has 130,000km with a clean service history at a CMC dealer.

1. What is the best fuel consumption I should expect in kilometres per litre? It has averaged 5km per litre.

2. I am told the gearbox is four-speed. It has a 4HP-24. How does this compare with a five-speed box? I also cannot find the Overdrive switch.

3. These “tune ups” to improve consumption, are they real? If so, what do they entail? Some guy is promising 11km per litre on the highway after the tune up. I am not convinced a V8 engine can be this kind to anyone.

Muriithi.

1. The “best” fuel consumption will depend on your deftness as a “hypermiler” (one who ekes ridiculous mileages from a litre of fuel, usually through strange, illegal, or unsafe driving tactics). Five kpl for the old 4.6 sounds just about correct in normal driving situations.

2. Comparison between a four-speed and a five-speed? Depends on the gear ratios in the transmissions, but generally a five-speed will offer better acceleration (the engine speed can stay in the power band for a longer period of time) AND fuel economy (you do not need to rev very high in one gear to gain enough power to push you into the next), but NOT simultaneously. Also, the differences will be marginal and hardly noticeable in day-to-day use.

Also, not all automatic transmissions come with an Overdrive switch.

3. Yes, the tune-ups are real, but not to the extent you claim there. Simple tune-ups just involve getting the engine back to manufacturer settings through replacing worn out bits, refastening bolts that may have played loose, checking for loose or frayed wiring in the ignition system, and removing carbon from the valvetrain.

But these actions will NOT make a P38 4.6 V8 attain 11 kpl; if there exists such a P38 out there, I would like to buy it immediately. The best you can hope for is eight kpl, and that is by sedate driving on the highway.

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Hi Baraza,

I am an ardent reader of you column and bravo for a job well done. I recently purchased a Mercedes Benz E 280 year 2006 model and have driven it on Kenyan roads for less than one month.

On the dashboard are two messages displayed — “ESP defective visit workshop” and” Active light system unavailable”.

Kindly shed some light on what these two messages relate to and how they can be sorted out without much ado.

Kenneth.

“ESP Defective” means the electronic stability programme is malfunctioning and needs to be looked at. Without it, the Benz may become a bit of a handful when driven hard or on less-than-perfect surfaces. Without the ESP, it simply means the car will not compensate for your mistakes and/or lack of driving skill the way it used to.

The ESP defect may be a bug in the software or a malfunctioning sensor out of hundreds (yaw sensors, G-sensors, throttle position sensors, brake sensors etc… any sensor associated with vehicle dynamics could be the culprit).

The software bug is curable by programing the ECU. The sensor issues are curable by replacement and/or recalibration. The ESP is a complex system that uses ABS, EBD, an almost unfathomable network of sensors and/or adjustment of engine power, among other things, to “stabilise” a car to prevent skidding and/or oversteer/understeer.

“Active light system unavailable” means that one of the features found on higher level Benz cars such as yours is either not working, or was never there in the first place. Just to be sure, does it say “unavailable” or does it say “inoperative”? My research on that problem shows “inoperative”.

Anyway, this is not about nitpicking on the accuracy of descriptions. The active light system on a Mercedes was a setup where the headlamps followed the movements of the steering wheel to improve night-time visibility and optimise safety.

The swivel feature of the headlamps may, thus, have been rendered inactive or was never there in the first place (active light system was an option on the W211 sedan, of which yours is one).

Either way, a visit to a garage is in the books for you, my friend.

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Dear Baraza,

Recently, I took my G-Touring Toyota station wagon for a window repair. The wire man asked if my car overheats and I replied in the negative. The temperature gauge does not go even an 1/8 of the scale even after doing 15km.

He then asked me to open the bonnet and start the car to idle until gauge reaches the centre. To quicken the process, he accelerated the car while idle. The gauge reached the centre, something it has never done before. The fan went on and the gauge went slightly down, then stopped.

He told me everything seemed fine.

From that day the gauge started moving more than 1/8 up to the centre in the same distance I normally cover — around 15km to 20km. Could he have tampered with its functioning by accelerating the car while stationary? This is worrying me, although it does not go beyond the centre. Why is this? I check the coolant regularly. It has no power loss.

Second, does this model have problems with the gear system? I find the top gear a bit stiff to engage.The other day I added gear box oil but still the problem persists. It is a very well maintained car. I mostly use V-power but sometimes I use the ordinary fuel. Which one is the best and why?

Sammy.

Stop worrying about the engine temperature.

That mechanic did not ruin your car. That is how car engines are supposed to behave. When the thermometer reached “centre” position then the fans started suddenly, that was just the cooling system of the car trying to maintain the engine at an optimum operating temperature.

The fans are activated by the thermostat to prevent the engine from getting too hot, then they go off when the temperature drops. Your car is fine.

But again, your car is not really fine. Difficulty in engaging fifth gear means one of two things: Either the linkage is getting wonky or the fifth gear synchroniser unit is worn out. The linkage can easily be fixed with basic tools. Replacement of the synchroniser unit demands disassembling the entire gearbox.

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Dear Baraza,

I recently got one of these A150 Mercedes cars and every time I need to shift either from Drive to Neutral or Reverse (and vice versa), the whole car jerks. At times when I shift to Reverse, it does not engage even if I depress the gas pedal. It then jerks into motion quite violently when it finally does. Other times, particularly when driving in traffic, it “forgets” to shift up.

It remains in very high revs or develops a rumbling noise and does not shift smoothly. Now I am being advised to change the entire gearbox. These problems are particularly worse in the morning. I also find it to have massive under-steer for a car of that size. Please help before I lose my mind.

Ben.
I need not state the obvious: You clearly have transmission problems.

When the mechanics recommended a change of the TCM, had they done a diagnosis or did they follow the path of the electronic scapegoat? (Sensor problem over here! sensor problem over there! Even your flat tyre has been caused by a sensor problem!)

Most of the time when the TCM acts up, it might not be necessary to replace it; reprogramming it will do. It may be that the TCM and ECU are out of sync or have lost synergy and have started “confusing” each other.

A diagnosis should have been done on the original TCM to see whether the problem lay therein or not.That aside, these folks now want you to get a new gearbox. Have they verified that the current one is completely unserviceable or did they follow the path of “replacement is easier than repair”?

If they know nothing about the automatic transmission of a Mercedes-Benz A150, let them be honest and say so. They might end up telling you to buy a new car.Last thing: Does your A150 have an owner’s/operator’s handbook?

If yes, read it, especially the chapter that says “Transmission”. One of the things you said has led me to believe that your initial problems were caused by incorrect ATF levels within the transmission, and this may or may not have caused some transmission damage.

Sometimes it is as simple as topping up/draining excess fluids instead of shouting about “sensors” and “computers”, like a good number of Kenyan mechanics do (this has not escaped my notice, and the root cause I believe comes from the culture of apprenticeship from the days of yore instead of proper, formal training).

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Do Subarus really wear faster than Toyotas? I don’t think so

Hallo Baraza,

I want to purchase my first car and I’m in love with the Subaru Impreza (LA-GG3, 1500cc). Some of my friends are advising me to instead opt for a Toyota 100, 110, G-Touring or Allion, based on the following arguments;

1. The Subaru Impreza 1500cc consumes more fuel than a Toyota of the same engine capacity. The reason being that a Toyota Allion, for example, has a VVT-i engine while Subaru doesn’t. Is this true? If so, does Subaru have a similar offer to Toyota’s VVT-i engine technology?

2. Subaru spare parts are quite expensive compared to Toyota’s. How expensive are they on average? Ten per cent more, for instance? But again I hear Subaru parts wear out less often than Toyotas, thus the maintenance cost balances out. How true is this?

3. Subarus depreciate in value quite fast as compared to Toyotas, thus have a poor resale value. What is the average depreciation rate of a Subaru per year? What makes it lose value that fast compared to a Toyota?

Please advise as I intended to use my car mostly within Nairobi. Over to you.

Sande Stephen.

1. Let those friends of yours conduct a scientific test that specifically proves the Impreza will burn more fuel than a Corolla 100/G-Touring/Allion under the same conditions.

In the course of doing that, let them also say exactly how much more fuel is burnt, and let them also prove that the disparity (if any) in consumption cannot be compensated for by a simple adjustment in driving style and circumstances. While at it, ask them what AVCS means in reference to a Subaru engine, what its function is, what VVT-i means in reference to a Toyota engine and what its function is.

Make sure the answers to these last four questions are not similar in any way. If they are, then they owe you an apology for leading you down the garden path. Some friends, those are.

2. The same technique applies. I cannot quote the prices of these cars’ parts off-the-cuff, and my status as columnist has reached the point where any inquiries will be followed by cries of “Put me in the paper first, then I’ll get you a good deal!”

And anyway, my work is to review cars and offer advise where I can, not provide cataloging services for manufacturers and parts shops. So ask your friends to come up with two similar price lists: one for Toyota and one for Subaru, and compare the listings. And yes, Subaru cars are generally more robust than Toyotas, so they are less likely to break in similar conditions.

3. The question is: which Subaru? From (b) above the opposite would be true: since Subaru cars are less likely to go bang, then it follows they would hold their value longer. That is, unless we are talking turbocharged cars, in which case engine failures are not uncommon. Of particular notoriety is the twin-turbo Legacy GT.

Poor care and/or lack of sufficient knowledge on how to properly operate a turbo engine on the owner/driver’s part is the chief contributor to these failures.

Also, when one buys a turbocharged Subaru, one finds it extremely difficult to drive “sensibly” (for lack of a better word). Hard launches, manic acceleration and extreme cornering manoeuvres tend to be the order of the day, and these tend to wear the car out really fast. So maybe you are right: Subarus may depreciate faster than Toyotas, but this depends on the previous owner’s tendencies.

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Bwana Baraza,

1. I have had an ex-Japan Nissan X-Trail for the last three years. It must be about 11 years old now. As it grows older, something pleasantly surprising is happening; it is using less fuel per kilometre than it used to when it was ‘new’. In the past, I would fill the tank, drive to Naro Moru (about 190 kilometres, five of them off tarmac) and by the time I got back in Nairobi I would have just about a quarter tank to go. The empty tank light would come on at around the 470-kilometre mark.

Of late, I am coming back with slightly above half. I have hit the 560-kilometre mark with the fuel light still off. Might it be because these days I use only V-Power fuel for long journeys?

2. I want to purchase a used Isuzu D-Max or Hilux. Which would you advise me to go for, considering petrol or diesel as well as maintenance costs? It will be used for farming purposes in Naro Moru and regular trips to Nairobi. I hear (these may be rumours) that diesel engines demand prompt service, and that the service parts are more expensive compared to petrols.

I also hate the ‘morning sickness’ they exhibit when cranked in the wee hours. Given that Naro Moru is quite cold at night, the sluggishness might be regular. But I could be wrong.

B Chege.

1. Must be the V-Power. It has better quality additives and a high octane rating which not only cleans various engine parts, but also reduces the risk of knocking. Another cause of “improved” engine operation with time would be “bedding in”; where the various engine components tend to “settle” and assume tight-fitting mating surfaces.

I find this unlikely because the car has been in use for 11 years…  the engine must have bedded in by now, and anyway, with new technology, bedding is becoming less of a factor in engine performance. A third, and very unlikely cause, would be a malfunctioning fuel gauge.

2. You must be referring to the KB300 (that’s the name in South Africa, around here we just call it the DMAX 3.0). In maintenance terms, the petrol engine is cheaper overall, but diesel engines offer better performance — in terms of torque — and economy (both the Hilux and the DMAX have 2.5-litre and 3.0-litre turbocharged diesel engines).

The “rumours” are true, diesel engines require careful service, especially now that these two are turbocharged. And they are more expensive — in case of repairs or replacement. That “morning sickness” you describe is because either the driver is not using the glow-plug (it warms the engine block prior to starting), or the glow plug itself is not working properly (or at all).

With these new diesel engines, the glow plug operation is automated, it is not necessary to operate it separately like earlier engines.

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Hi Baraza,

I would like to hear your opinion about the Toyota Mark II Blit; its power, comfort, stability, off-road capabilities, maintenance costs, fuel consumption and spare parts.

SM.

Mark II Blit, eh?

Power: Good, especially the one with the 2.5-litre turbocharged 1JZ-GTE engine.

Comfort: Good. Not excellent, and not shabby either. Just “good”.

Stability: Good also. A bit prone to oversteering, especially due to its propensity for spinning the inside wheel when a corner is taken hard under power.

Off-road: Don’t even go there.

Consumption: Depends. If you keep in mind that you are driving a large vehicle with a 2.0-litre or 2.5-litre 6-cylinder engine, then it is understandable that asking for 12-15kpl might be a bit ambitious. If you expect Premio or Corolla-like economy figures, you will be bitterly disappointed.

Spare Parts: What about the spares?

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Hi Baraza,

I want to buy a small family car and I’m thinking of the Suzuki Alto, 2007 model, 800cc with a manual gearbox and the Toyota Duet, 1,000cc with an automatic box. Both are going for Sh250,000. Advise me accordingly because I’m after :

1. Fuel efficiency

2. Reliability

3. Travelling up-country twice a year

4. Minimal maintenance cost.

God bless you.

David.

A small correction, Sir. These are NOT family cars, unless you are looking for a divorce and for your children to hate you. Or your family consists of three people only, but even then….

1. Fuel efficiency: The 800cc car wins in city driving, but by a small margin (by small I mean really small, given how tiny these cars are to begin with, and how minute their engines are). The 1.0 litre car will fare better on the highway.

2. Reliability: Could go either way. I’d vote for the Suzuki, because the Duet is a re-badged Daihatsu and may not have Toyota’s trademark reliability as part of its DNA.

3. For your own sake, you are better off in any other car except these two (and their ilk of similar size and engine capacity). But since you asked, the Duet is better, because of its “bigger” (more substantial) engine.

4. I seriously doubt if there are any actual differences in maintenance costs in cars this small.

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Hello Baraza,

I am in the process of importing a Mitsubishi Outlander. The car has a number of accessories, though I can only figure out two of them (the ABS and PS (which I presume is Power Steering). Kindly assist in interpreting the following: ABS, AC, AW, FOG, NV, PS, PW and WAB.

Samuel.

ABS: Anti-Blockier System, better known as Anti-Lock Brakes. It is a vehicle safety system that allows the maximum braking effort without locking the wheels and/or skidding. It applies the principles of cadence braking (on-and-off braking technique, such as you might see drivers of heavy commercial vehicles applying) and threshold braking (applying braking effort until the point just when the tyres begin to lock up).

AC: Air-Conditioning. Keeps you cool when the world outside your car is sweating.

AW: Given the make and type of car, I think AW in this case means All-Wheel Drive. Other possible meanings could be “Auxiliary Winding (voltage regulation)”, “Anti-Wear (hydraulic oil, additives)”, “Anchor Winch (for off road vehicles especially)”, or even “All Weather”

FOG: Fog lamps present. I think.

NV: No idea. I know NVH stands for Noise, Vibrations and Harshness. However, these are not car accessories but characteristics directly linked to a car’s construction

PS: Power steering. A more common acronym would be PAS: Power-Assisted Steering

PW: Power Windows. Electrically controlled.

WAB: No idea either. The best I can come up with is “Wheelchair Accessible Bus (?)”

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Hi Baraza,

I have a question about my recently imported 2006 ex-Japan VW Passat fitted with V5 engine:

1. The car has a 2324cc, five-cylinder petrol straight engine and is a station wagon. Is it common on our roads?

2. I do 40 kilometres daily to and from work and, gauging from the amount of fuel I use, I do about 7.8kpl and spend Sh3,000 from Monday to Friday (on Sh117/litre). I am a very careful driver, is this fuel consumption normal?

3. At some point the Check Engine light came on and upon taking it for diagnostics, the errors were cleared and the light went off. The mechanic said it was due to a previous engine service interval. After two weeks, the same light came on again, this time the mechanic blamed it on Unleaded Super petrol and recommended I use V-Power. Do I really need to be using the more expensive V-Power?

4. The engine used to whine a bit, especially in the morning and evening. The same mechanic told me the power steering pump was damaged and needed replacement. He, however, refilled the power steering fluid and the whining sound is now gone. Do I still need to replace the pump?. A second-hand unit will cost me around Sh23,000 while a new one is going for Sh52,000.

5. Is this car a good buy, considering the expenses? I imported it in April this year and it has clocked 81,000 kilometres on the odometre.

I will appreciate you feedback.

Mwangi.

1. I agree with you: I don’t think this car is very common. I think I have seen no more than three B6 Passat estate cars here in Nairobi. Then the V5 engine is also not a popular import option, and it was not sold by CMC.

2. How bad is the traffic on your road? The figure seems realistic to me, especially given the car has a 2.3 litre engine… with five cylinders (sporty).

3. What error codes did you get when the diagnosis was done? And if the octane rating of the fuel you were using was not ideal, then V-Power should have cured it. One other thing. Some petrol stations would “claim” to be selling Unleaded Premium but instead they peddle some swill that would only be fit for motorbikes and chain saws.

If you understand octane ratings, check out the results of the test done on some “super” petrol that was anonymously acquired from a local fuel forecourt (the company’s identity has been retained until further investigations). Tell me what that octane rating is worth. Clearly not Premium as recommended by manufacturers.

There are reports of other dealers selling water and subsequently ruining people’s engines in the process. You may be a victim of this. More to come soon.

4. If the power steering pump was actually damaged, then yes, you need to replace it. If it was not damaged — the whining was just a result of the whirring of a hydraulic fluid pump spooling with no hydraulic fluid to pump — then a replacement is not necessary… especially given the figures you are quoting.

5. I would say the car is not a bad one. Volkswagen make good cars, the B6 is a looker, wonderful to drive (I am sure that 2.3 litre V5 engine is a hoot) and the estate version must surely be more versatile than the sedan. the trick is to find someone (a garage) who will maintain it well for you.

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2013 Range Rover: The bar has been raised… yet again

Hallo Baraza,
Thank you for your very resourceful articles that sometimes remind me of a Sunday Nation humour writer by the name Mwalimu Andrew!

I have a 2009 left-hand drive Toyota Landcruiser Hardtop that we bought brand new and had it shipped from Toyota Motors Europe in Gibralta, South of Spain. It has so far done approximately 10,000 kilometres.

We currently wish to dispose it but do not seem to know how much would be a good price, considering we spent about $65,000USD (about Sh5.4 million) to but and transport it all the way to Nairobi.

I have even contacted the local Toyota dealers who quote Sh7 million for a new one, but they don’t seem to know what is the best price or market for this vehicle. Kindly assist.

Regards,

Kelvin

The fact that the driver sits where the passenger is usually found will complicate matters for you. As a car, it may well be still valuable, but not in Kenya. It will be a long search before you find someone who will buy a left-hand drive car for use in a right-hand drive country at its actual value.

AA (Automobile Association) would be a good place to start to get the real value of the car. From there, you may have to look outside the borders for a quick sale. Try Southern Sudan, they have LHDs there. Or Somalia (problem is there is a war going on there).

Hi Baraza JM

First, thanks for a job well done. You have made Wednesday’s Daily Nation a must-read. I would like you to do a comprehensive comparison between two cars: Toyota Corona (1600cc, 1800cc and 2000cc) and Toyota Carina (1800cc and 1500cc).

Please consider durability, fuel consumption and spare parts availability. These two cars are old models; what some people would call “out of fashion”. Which one would you advise a first-timer to go for? And, finally, why are there no more productions of the Toyota Carina?

Regards,

Maina ML

Maybe you should have specified the model years for these cars. But, anyway, except for fuel consumption, everything else is the same for all model permutations that you have given there. The 1.5s are the most economical; the 2.0 litre the most thirsty. The 1.8 has always been the best compromise.

Out of personal experience, I would go for the Carina (Ti), in 1.8 guise. Sure, you will look like you are driving one of Nairobi’s 10 million taxi-cabs, but the balance between performance and economy in the 1.8 is exceptional.
The Carina is not made any more because now we have the Allion.

Hi Baraza,

Thanks a lot for the wonderful, highly informative articles. I own a 1995 Toyota Corolla 100 that I love to bits. I got it as a third owner, so the first thing I did was change the suspension and now it runs like new.

My mechanic recently discovered a leak in the steering system requiring I top up the ATF every three to four weeks. He advises an overhaul of the whole steering system, arms and all, but I think this is a little exaggeration. Is there a way I can have the leak fixed without necessarily changing the arms since it steers just fine?

Second, I love speeding and have installed a second set of brake discs on the rear set of wheels. Does this in anyway interfere with the performance of the car? I kind of enjoy wheezing through traffic knowing I can halt at will!

Thank you.

Eric Ochomo

Where is the leak? If it is in a little pipe from the reservoir for the PAS, you don’t need an overhaul. If it is in the steering box, you still don’t need an overhaul. In fact, you might not need an overhaul at all, just find the leak and plug it.

I’d like to see what your car looks like with two sets of brake kits at the back, instead of one. And, if you want to stop really well, brake bias should be set towards the front. Having stronger brakes at the back is inviting oversteer, instability and possibly fishtailing if your car does not have EBD (which it doesn’t).

When slowing down, the weight of the car is thrown forwards, which is why the front brakes need more stopping power than the rear ones.

Hello
I bought a Toyota Fortuner from Toyota Nairobi in March this year and use it mostly within town, thus I do not use 4X4 add-on. I am getting a fuel mileage of nine kilometres per litre average, yet it is a manual diesel.

It is big and smart but has no extra-ordinary comfort (climbing up to the seat isn’t very easy). I paid Sh5 million for the car, so tell me, did I make the right decision?

Dipak

Dipak, do you FEEL you made the right decision? Is there a nagging feeling of regret or some underlying suspicion that you threw good money away? If yes, then no: that was not the right decision. If no, then yes: you made the right decision.

Over and above the consumer advice and motor-journalist reviews given on cars, there is also a secret desire that shapes our decisions, and this desire is not always rational.

I’m dreaming of getting an Allion, changing the gearbox into a manual and supercharging the thing, but I know it will cost me money, the car’s reliability will go to the dogs and I will use the (very expensive) supercharger’s abilities less than five per cent of the time. I am also dreaming of getting a Defender 110, with a V8 engine.

Both options do not make any sense at all, but I doubt I will regret my decision if I decide to take that path. So, again I ask: how do YOU feel about your car?

How are you Mr Baraza?I want to thank you for your quick response to my e-mail, which was on the user’s manual of a Toyota Harrier and the use of various function keys on the console. You hinted that if you had the details of the vehicle you could try and obtain a manual for me.

As you may have guessed, I have not managed to get it, so I have been relying on the information you gave me and it has been very useful. However, I have a few questions: 

i) The opposite side of the POWER key is written SNOW. When is it appropriate to use this facility?

ii) Can the SNOW key be used together with the gear shift at position ‘L’?

iii) The details of the vehicle are: Harrier, manufactured in the year 2000, 3000cc, 24-valve four wheel drive. If it’s not too much to ask, how about trying to obtain the manual for me?

iv) Some mechanics claim they can do ‘manual diagnosis’ on vehicles. Is this possible? How is it done?

We all appreciate what you have been doing for the Kenyan motorist. Thank you very much.

Peter.

Nairobi.

Nice to hear from you again Peter. Here goes:

i) Since we don’t have snow here, I’m guessing it is usable in very slippery (but NOT deep) mud. But it is not really necessary, one can still manoeuvre without using it.

ii) That would be unnecessary. The PWR and SNOW settings are for the ECT gearbox (different settings). L locks the gearbox in 1st, so there will be no need to adjust the settings of the gearbox shift patterns and lock-up control.
iii) Let me see what I can do…. But I’m not promising anything.

iv) Manual diagnosis can be done, but only on mechanical bits. It is quite easy: it is done by eye (look for broken, loose, frayed, worn out, cracked, misplaced misaligned, discoloured, leaking or burnt components).

It is also done by a simple, short road test (be keen on ride quality, steering behaviour, shakes, rattles, wandering, sagging, bouncing, diving, squatting, braking behaviour etc).

Also, signs of leakage, smoke or funny smells or noises… all these constitute a manual diagnosis. However, “manual” diagnosis cannot be done on things like electronic equipment or sensors. Let your mechanic know you are aware of that.

Hello Baraza,Thank you for the good job. I’m a newly qualified driver who knows nothing about cars. However, I’m planning to buy my first car by December, hence I need your advice.

Please compare for me these three cars in terms of availability of spare parts, durability, stability on the road in case I need to drive from Nairobi to Narok over the weekend, and, above all, fuel consumption.

The cars are Subaru Impreza 1500cc, Mazda Demio and Honda Fit. Please consider the fact that I like the Subaru a lot. Thank you.

Annah.

If you like Subaru a lot, then I will ignore the rest of your question and ask you to buy a Subaru. Why buy something else and then spend your driving days imagining what owning the car you desired would have been like?

There is nothing you will regret about it that you cannot also regret in the other cars. If anything, it outshines the other two in numbers of mechanics and garages doing them: Honda and Mazda are only making inroads on the import market as of the recent past, but the Impreza has been imported in sizable shiploads since the days of the GC chassis.

Baraza

Why are AMG versions of Mercedes Benzes not readily available in Kenya, or are the local Benz buyers unaware of them? Maybe you should explain what the AMG spec really is.

Spider Waigwa

I can’t help but notice you signed your name as “Spider”.

Anyway, AMG Mercs are not readily available for several reasons, first being a lot of people are unaware of what an AMG Benz is (capable of). Then there is the cost, both of purchase and running (fuel and service/maintenance). Maybe one day I will explain what an AMG Benz is: it should be easy since almost all of them use the same engine (and what an engine!)

Local mechs may not be able to deal with these units, except for St Austin’s Garage, which is a subsidiary of DT Dobie. I have spotted quite a number of AMGs there (including SLs and S Classes)

Hello Baraza,

Thanks for your very well researched articles. I have a Toyota Corolla G-Touring that has no other issues except when engaged on Gear 4, when the lever jumps to neutral even at highway speeds. Mechs tell me I need to change the gearbox. Is there a cheaper option?

David

I had an EP82 Starlet with that same problem. I later sold it (with that same problem). Anyway, don’t panic, I’m not asking you to sell your car. You don’t even need a new gearbox.

The cause of the problem is either internal or external. Internal causes could be worn bearings (very common). External causes are linkage issues (easy to diagnose), or a problem with the gearbox mountings (not that easy).

Irrespective of which of these causes is the source of your fourth gear woes, as you can see, it will not take a new gearbox to sort it out.

Hello Mr Baraza,

I’m an avid reader of your very helpful articles and have utmost respect for your knowledge of cars (and trucks). With the current weather conditions, I have noted an increase of accidents in which the vehicles lose traction on very wet tarmac and start drifting.

I was a victim of such an incident recently, and would like you to advise us on the steps to take should one lose control of the car. I hear in manual cars, one gears down to reduce the car’s speed before applying the brakes.

But what about the automatics? Lastly, where can one get their upholstery done should their car take a swim? Looking forward to your response. Nduati.

The safest way to drive in the wet is to lower your speed and increase the distance between your car and the one ahead of you. You don’t have to gear down; however, if you want to gear down, brake first then gear down, don’t gear down then brake.

When you shift down without braking, that is when you will drift due to the extra burst of torque brought about by the lower gear. This is actually one of the drifting techniques used by professional drivers: gear down at speed, then counter steer the car once it starts sliding (and it WILL slide). Nowadays many car wash outfits offer cleaning of both interiors and exteriors. Any big outfit will do the job well.

Hi Baraza,

Thanks for the worthy counsel, though I must say you are often somewhat hard on most of us as we continue exhibiting inherent peculiarity in petro-misery.

Now, I haven’t seen much in this column regarding the Toyota Rush. Would you say the 2007 model stands any chance against the Forester (say) 2006 model in terms of stability, performance, handling, looks, fuel economy (pardon me!) and variations in terms of accessories?

Austin

Aah, the return of the Toyota Rush to this inbox. As to whether or not it can stack up against a Forester, here are the answers:

Stability: No

Performance: No

Handling: No

Looks: I guess by this you mean appearance. Well, that is relative, but for me…. No.

Fuel economy: Actually, yes, and it can go one better, by quite a margin. 1300cc vs 2000cc is no contest (pardon me!)

Variations in terms of accessories: No.