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Should I get a Honda Airwave or just stick to a trusted Toyota?

Thanks for your informative articles. Kindly contrast and compare Honda Airwave and any Toyota such as the Toyota Wish. I have seen many Kenyans buy Hondas.

I wanted to buy an Airwave but out of the people I talked to, including mechanics, about one out of ten encouraged me. One of my friends who owned one a 1500cc mentioned that it even consumes less than a normal Toyota with the same 1500cc.

Majority cited issues of availability of spare parts and resale value. I looked more spacious than a Toyota Wish considering that you can fold the back seats. The price difference between the two then was around Sh200,000.What is your take on Hondas? Is it that the Toyota did a lot in marketing?

Ken

 

Hondas are an open secret in the motoring world. If you want the best of Japan while avoiding the too-obvious Toyota, get a Honda.

If anything, this is the one car that is more reliable than a Toyota, too bad the Civic did not and does not sell like the Corolla; and Honda doesn’t build a pickup.

They do build and sell dozens of millions of motorcycles, though, and no, that is not hyperbole, they DO build motorbikes in the eight figures.

Spare parts are not and should never be a problem. How many Airwaves have you seen around? How do THOSE owners maintain their vehicles? Feel free to join them.

Resale value may be disheartening at the moment owing to the “should-I-shouldn’t-I?” uncertainty and indecisive mindset that you and many others seem to have; so hopefully this will clear things up: Yes, you should. I plan to, too, one day…. VTEC coming soon to a column near you.

Residual values are something else; related to resale value but not dependent on it.

Actually, the converse is true: resale value is dependent on residual value. Residual value is how well the car holds up over several years of usage and ownership, but this is not per car, it is per model of car.

Here are examples: cars with good residual values are best exemplified by the Toyota Landcruiser and the Toyota Hilux. They simply never depreciate.

This does not mean that you cannot find a grounded or worthless Hilux, you can and will, though this will be an isolated case; but as a model, it maintains its physical (not sentimental) value over time.

Cars with bad residual values? They’re almost exclusively European and almost exclusively French. Peugeot tops the list closely followed by its fellow Frog-mobiles: Renault and Citroen. Alfa Romeo also joins the list of Euro-letdowns, but this brand of car is usually rescued from ignominy by its sentimental value. Its residual value is below zero.

Toyota may have done a lot of marketing, but the biggest contributing factor to their success was they let their products speak for themselves. The two aforementioned vehicles, the Hilux and the Landcruiser, have done more to market Toyota as a brand than a billion-dollar advertising budget ever could.

Honda’s engines may also speak for themselves, but this is only in closed circles: Ask anyone to explain what VTEC means (Variable Valve Timing and Lift Electronic Control) or how it works (a camshaft with two cam profiles or two different camshafts; one of which is oriented for economy and the other for performance, and the switchover occurs at around 6,000rpm) and they’ll stare at you like you were a creature from Star Wars.

Yet VTEC engines are the one type of engine to have never suffered a single failure in their entire history, not one, and this is in spite of them being in production since 1988 and now numbering in the tens of millions.

How about the fact that Honda designed a cylinder head (CVCC heads) for use in its American version of the Civic hatchback, a design so delightfully simple and so fiendishly clever that the fuel economy figures achieved from a carburetor-fed engine from the 1970s are still unbeaten even by today’s cleverest EFI systems?

This geeky techno-frippery may be what scared people off Honda. Everybody is cagey about innovation, especially the really technical ones.

Try selling an all-in-one app to a major corporation and see them approach it like a cat approaching a bath.

Then again, maybe the movies,  newsreels of war theatres, bush ambulances, adventuring tourists, lifestyling twentysomethings, successful businessmen and happy farmers almost always feature a Toyota Landcruiser or a Toyota HIlux and we are thus indoctrinated from childhood to believe that Toyota is the beginning and the end of everything; anything outside of that is nothing but a brief and temporary sojourn into the unknown.

 

Hi Baraza, 

Does engaging ‘N’ (neutral gear) when going downhill save on fuel, mine is a Toyota  DX with a 4E engine, what’s  the average fuel consumption in terms of l/km.

Matata

Yes, coasting downhill saves fuel… somewhat. It is not the best fuel-saving driving technique, though. A Toyota DX will return anything from 10km/l to 20km.k, depending on who is driving and how it is being driven, but the mean (average) and mode (commonest) rate of consumption is around 13km/l.

 

Hi JM,

I am an ardent reader of your motoring column every Wednesday. Keep up the good work.

A friend of mine is looking for a mid-size 4×4 vehicle, probably a SUV. The car will be used by his wife in rural areas on weather roads. The wife is a teacher and every morning crosses a seasonal river when going to school.

He is weighing on four Models: Nissan X-trail, Mazda CX-7, Nissan Murano and Subaru Tribeca. All 2008 models.  

A quick check on Youtube shows a lot similarities on handling of off-road conditions for the four vehicles. This leaves us more confused.

Given the kind of terrain the vehicle will be used on, which one is better putting into considerations other factors such as:

(i) Durability;

(ii) Repair costs;

(iii) Fuel Consumption;

(iv) Stability control; and;

(v) Comfort. 

David

 

I will do something unusual this time round and ignore the actual question you are asking, and go ahead and answer your inquiry according to what stands out with these vehicles. You can make your judgment call from my seemingly impertinent (or are they?) responses.

To start with, yes, YouTube is mostly right; these cars are basically facsimiles of each other. This is the primary reason why I will ignore the (i) to (v) queries up there, except for (iii).

Let us focus on the elephant in the room and think about that seasonal river you are talking about…. I have sampled the first generations of all the cars listed (and the second generation X- Trail too), and the most fitting for wading through a water carpet thicker than ankle-deep would be the X-Trail.

Forget the others, their ground clearances are too low and/or their wheelbases too long and/or their overhangs too intrusive for them to make a case for themselves as anything other than high-priced shopping baskets for the housewives with slightly larger disposable incomes. This is especially noteworthy of the Tribeca.

Speaking of the Subaru: it has the biggest engine here, a 3.6 litre flat six (forget the original Tribeca B9 with its weedy little 3.0 litre), so it is also the thirstiest: 5km/l on a normal day, stretching to 7km/l when the going is good.

The drop in fuel prices may have brought smiles in many a Tribeca-borne household. I liked its automatic gearbox the best too, but the swoopy, futuristic, beige interior of the test car I drove is the kind that attracts fingerprints like a mirror in the hands of a toddler.

The Tribeca is also the lowest riding, whether for real or apparently is hard to tell; but the long wheelbase doesn’t help -making it the most inappropriate for off-tarmac jaunts.

It is the only car in this list that seats seven, though (the rest seat five), so you could always look for paying passengers to offset the fuel bills…

The Mazda CX7 is a rocket ship. It is hard to tell exactly what the car was meant for, because what starts life as a cramped cross-over utility — in essence what looks like a Mazda 6 with a hatch and a lift-kit- is then saddled with a limp-wristed engine that has no torque. To ensure that this lack of torque is not noticed by drivers, the engine has a little extra something bolted to it: a stinking turbocharger.

The result is this Mazda goes like a getaway vehicle in a PG13 TV program.

If you want to humiliate the Tribeca-driving housewives on tarmac, then this is your weapon of choice. Sadly for it, speed is about all that it’s good for: with turbo comes compromised reliability (the front-mount intercooler is an especially sensitive sticking point) and woeful fuel bills. 245 horsepower ain’t a joke.

The CX7, however, comes a close second to the X-Trail in off-road acts.

Next up is the Murano. This is a car I lambasted not too long ago (to my own detriment: I have been unable to live down the dressing down I received from pundits who won’t calm down).

The first-generation model still looks funny to me; what with that fat rump at the back and the leering rictus up front. While the Mazda goes like a sports car, the best the Murano can do is claim to have an engine from a sports car: the veritable VQ35 unit from the Z33 Nissan 350Z, the famous Fairlady. The Murano is not that fast though. It also takes some getting used to: not everything is where you’d expect it to be.

Try filling up at a fuel forecourt for the first time in one and prepare for some red-faced scrabbling around in the driver’s foot-well looking for the release catch for the fuel filler cap. Here is a hint: stop looking, it doesn’t exist.

Another problem with the Nissan is one could easily end up with the more plebeian 2.5 litre 4-cylinder as opposed to the 3.5 V6, and you’d never know the difference… that is, until you try to overtake a Mazda CX7 and wonder why a 1200cc capacity advantage and two extra cylinders are not helping. Not a bad car for roughing it, but then again not quite at the CX7’s level.

Lastly, the X-Trail. This is the one you should get. It may not necessarily be the most durable (Murano), nor the most comfortable (Tribeca), nor the most stable (CX7) but it should be the cheapest to buy, fuel and maintain. It is definitely the most appropriate car for the terrain. It also has the most boring interior of the four cars. Invest in a good sound system to take your mind off the naff ambience.

 

Hi Baraza,

I have been thinking of two cars, Toyota Prius and Honda Civic hybrids. Tell me, what are the advantages and disadvantages of buying a hybrid car? Which one should I buy?

Baba Quinton

 

Advantages of a hybrid car: they put you in a good mood because you think you are saving the world. Disadvantages of a hybrid car: you are not actually saving the world.

Trade-off: the lower fuel bills will be a joy until you discover how much of a swine a hybrid car really is to fix. Ask your mechanic if he knows what Miller cycle is as opposed to Otto cycle.

If he cannot answer this, he cannot fix your Prius; even if he is also an electrician by night, he still can’t fix your Prius.

Between eating bitter fruit at 10am and eating bitter fruit at 3pm, which is better? Neither, at the end of it you still eat bitter fruit.

Get a Prius, there are quite a few around, maybe there exists an owner’s club for these things by now (a good source for unreliable and unverifiable information) and/or a graveyard of dead Prii/Pria/Prix/Priuses  (a good source of parts).

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The Land Rover Discovery 1 is relatively cheap

Baraza,

Your columns are very enlightening. I am looking to owning an old school Land Rover and I am interested in the Land Rover Discovery 1.  I am inclined towards the Tdi of between 2500 and 3000cc. According to my research, I can get one that fits my budget of Sh500,000 to 1m.

I have realised most of them have a worn-out interior while the exterior is in most cases relatively intact, despite most having been manufactured in the early ’90s. The transmission varies; it’s good in some while in others it needs a lot of work.
Could you please provide more information on the good, the bad, and the ugly? Solomon

The Good: the car will most likely be cheap. It is also one of the most hardy and most capable off-road vehicles out there.

Repairs will be delightfully simple and the Discovery 1 responds well to bush remedies, especially now that it shares many parts with the Land Rover Defender and Range Rover Classic from the same period. Driving a Discovery also offers one a sense of occasion: there are not that many Disco 1s still running out there.

The Bad: you can’t win. The diesel-powered versions are dreadfully slow and sound like someone kicking a rusty can full of nails down a cobbled street, or like a very busy quarry.

Raucous is what I’d describe it as. The petrol-powered versions are marginally faster than the diesel units, but they are still slow. The engine won’t rev and, therefore, the car won’t accelerate. To compound matters is the fearsome thirst, courtesy of the ancient V8s under the bonnet. You can’t win.

The Ugly: Rust and handling. The Land Rovers of the ’80s and early ’90s were prone to rust, especially in and around the steel chassis. The handling was awful: cornering usually meant the door handles would scrape the tarmac. *Note: this is hyperbole, but to be honest, the body roll that the Discovery 1 and its sibling, the Range Rover Classic, suffered from was epic. It felt like a loaded trawler trying to survive a particularly nasty tempest in the open sea. To cap it all is the terrible interior space, especially around the driver’s quarters. You have to be really short to drive one comfortably.

Redemption: the 300Tdi is actually not so bad. Its performance is passable, its fuel economy is actually good and it doesn’t sound like a giant chewing magnets and large rocks. Handling can be improved with aftermarket suspension bits, but there is nothing you can do about the rust (except hope for the best) or the poor legroom (modify the driver’s seat and to Hades with whoever sits behind you).

Dear JM,
Allow me to appreciate your informative articles and opinions. I drive a Peugeot 406. Recently, the temperature gauge was indicating high engine temperatures.

The mechanic diagnosed it as a failed thermostat and went on to remove it. The problem has since been “cured”. He further advised that there is no need to install another one.

How important is the thermostat and is it safe to maintain a vehicle without one.

Secondly, I was being driven in a vehicle where the driver was extremely reluctant to use the AC despite the hot weather, arguing that it would lead to high fuel consumption. Kindly advise on the overall effect of AC on fuel consumption. Kind regards, Allan

The thermostat is important, otherwise it wouldn’t be installed in a vehicle, now, would it? However, you can still run your car without it.
The thermostat is a thermoregulator (controls temperature levels in the engine) that ensures the engine is always within the correct operating temperature range.

During cold starts, it will impede the operation of the water pump and fans, depriving the engine of coolant to facilitate rapid warm up. In hot conditions, the water pump and fans go into full operation to prevent overheating.

Many before you have removed the thermostats from their engines, and many after you will remove thermostats from their engines. However, to safeguard against overheating, the fans and water pump have to be connected directly to the electrical system, which means they are always running whenever the car is “On”.

On cold days, it takes much longer for the engine to warm up (increased fuel and oil consumption) and also the pump and fans sap power from the engine, but not so much that you’d notice. You might or might not want to reinstall the thermostat. It won’t kill your car to run without it, but it does have its advantages.

The use of AC increases fuel consumption, but the degree of increase differs from vehicle to vehicle, and it depends on the type of AC you are using and the engine size of the vehicle in question.

Cars with smaller engines suffer dramatic power losses and/or increased fuel consumption (up to 15 per cent in some cases) while vehicles with larger engines usually have so much power to spare that running the AC and other accessories has a very tiny effect on them. That is why you will find most cars with AC on the options list tend to have that option higher up in the range where the engines are bigger.

Choose.

You could increase your fuel consumption by less than 10 per cent (and counteract it by employing economy-biased driving techniques), or you could sweat it out (quite literally) in the name of saving fuel. I always use AC whenever the interior of the car feels like a sauna. Driving is supposed to be pleasurable, not punitive.

Dear Mr Baraza,

It’s always great to read your column on DN2.

I own a Subaru Impreza GG2, and intend to upgrade to a good, reliable, affordable and efficient 4×4 to run errands in Nairobi and, once a month, to make an off-road trip within the country.

For a long time I have admired the Subaru Tribeca B9 (talk of brand loyalty). Now, before I settle for B9, kindly expound on three specific 4x4s, that is, the Tribeca B9, BMW X5, and VW Tuareg (all at 3000cc).

And more specifically on the BMW X5, which is better, a petrol- or a diesel-powered engine?

Regards. Michael

Hello Michael,

Of the three cars, what more would you want to know? The VW is the most capable off-road machine of the lot (but this is not to say that the Touareg is the most capable 4×4 ever. It is beaten by many others). The BMW looks and feels the best to drive, and is the most technologically advanced. It is also the most comfortable and most economical. Affordability is relative.

The Tribeca will not go off-road. Have a look at its ground clearance and its subtle side-skirts then tell me how far off the beaten path you think it will go before running aground on a tree stump.

It also uses low profile road tyres compared with the chunky, all-terrain common to the German duo. At this point, brand loyalty will have to hit the back burner in favour of realism. If not, buy the Tribeca and a donkey with it, for you will need the animal to continue with your journey over some rough ground you will encounter.

The X5 diesel is quite good.

The X5 petrol is also quite good. The diesel offers economy, the petrol offers power. Once upon a time I was a diesel disciple whenever it came to SUVs, but I have started swaying towards petrol engines again (poweeeerrrr!). The diesel engine is a bit complicated, what with the turbos and intercoolers and DPFs, and common rails and injectors and God knows what else.

Dear Baraza,You have a totally exquisite article that I love to read once every issue is out. I wanted to know  if you have a special  blog page, Twitter account or website where I can be reading your articles  and learning many different things about automobiles. I would highly appreciate any information.Maxillian
Hello Maxillian,

Thank you for the compliment. I did have a blog once (www.motoringpressagency.com), then I had another one (www.autotalk.co.ke) but these have since become inactive for a variety of reasons that I would rather not get into right now.

I intend to create yet another one, an all-inclusive website with guest writers and videos and pictures and polls and all those features that make a website stand out from others. The original Motoring Press Agency website was like that, but the Autotalk one was a mite more bland.

I do have a Twitter handle: @BarazaJM. I also have a Facebook group, www.facebook.com/groups/barazajm. You can find some stuff there, but not much.

Hello Baraza,

I’m about to buy a station wagon and I still can’t make up my mind whether to go for a Honda Airwave, Toyota Fielder or Nissan Wingroad. Which one is the best in terms of reliability and durability. All of them at 1500cc.P. Kibaara

You have heard of the word “reputation”, right? Well, from reputation, there is a clear winner here, and that is the Toyota Fielder. From reputation, there is also a clear loser here: the Nissan Wingroad, with the additional non-bonus of being extremely hideous in its current form (what’s up with the rising roofline between the A and B pillars?)

The Honda Airwave falls dead centre, but by observation, either a) people don’t take good care of their Airwaves or b) the Airwave is as much of a sponge-cake as the Wingroad. These things don’t stick to their original shapes for long once they land here. Maybe they should cost more, and then people will value them more.