Posted on

Your engine’s faulty; Demios don’t normally make tractor-like sounds

Hello Baraza,
I really love your column and look forward to the Wednesday issue of the Daily Nation. I hope you will respond to my mail this time round.

Now on to my question: I have a 2005 Mazda Demio and of late, I have been seriously disturbed by a noise coming from under the hood.

The car sounds like a tractor/diesel engine and somebody can tell from a kilometre away that I am approaching. In fact, my children have become so used to the noise that they open the gate when I am still some distance away. Several mechanics have told me that it is the normal sound of Mazda engines. Is this true?

Secondly, the car is a 4WD. How do I know whether the 4WD is damaged or in working condition? Could it be the reason the consumption is not good since the car (1300cc) is doing about 11km/l, which I think is awful.I would greatly appreciate your help. MK

I would say something is definitely broken under the bonnet. Demios do not sound like tractors and/or diesel powered cars, unless so equipped. You might have an engine with a knock.

To test the 4WD, you could jack the car up, i.e put it on stands/stones. Just to be safe, prop up all four wheels.

Start the vehicle, then engage the transmission (D or first gear, depending on transmission type). Observe the wheels. If the 4WD is functional, all four wheels should spin.

If they do not, then the 4WD drivetrain has a problem, though I suspect you might get a dashboard light warning you of something to that effect.

Drivetrain problems could be a reason for high fuel consumption, though at 11 km/l, I would first ask what your driving style and environment look like before pointing a finger at the 4WD.

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Hello Baraza,
I am a great fan of your column, which I read religiously every Wednesday. I am in the process of importing a car and after looking at a few options (the usual Honda Fit, Mazda Demio, Honda Mobilio Spike), I settled on a Fiat Panda.

It is a 1200cc automanual model and I would think it might be the only one on Kenyan roads. What is your opinion of the car? I am comforted by the fact that the guys at Top Gear really liked it….

Fiat has a reputation for making unreliable cars and this might actually be reflected all across the range.

Fiat cars have long been known to break down not very long into the vehicle’s lifespan, as do Alfa Romeos, which are made by Fiat, while certain models of Ferrari (another Fiat brand) tend to spontaneously combust, which could be seen as a reliability issue. You cannot call a car reliable if it catches fire by itself, can you?

Let Top Gear be. The UK market is more varied and more forgiving than ours. Cars there, being mostly brand-new, are protected by warranties and dedicated dealer networks; Britons rarely ask whether spares for a particular car are available.

They know there exists such a thing as the internet, which they put to good use (mostly). So, for a motoring journalist with a six-figure annual income (in pounds sterling), a Fiat Panda is more an object of amusement and experimentation than the sole solution to his transport needs, as could be your case. Buy it at your own risk.

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Dear Mr Baraza,
Having just sold my Toyota Surf, I am planning to buy a Nissan Patrol 2007 model, diesel, or a Harrier Lexus 2006/07 model, petrol. I would greatly appreciate your advice. Pandit

This is what we call a vague or ambiguous question. What, exactly, is your dilemma? I think in a case like this, you decide what you want, whether it is a Nissan Patrol or a Toyota Harrier or a Lexus RX.

The purchase will mostly depend on how much money you have to spare and what you intend to use the car for. Do not buy the Patrol if you do not do any serious off-road excursions.

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Hi Baraza,
I want your expert advice on the following cars:
1) Between the Toyota Belta 1000cc and 1300cc, which is better for Kenyan roads and fuel efficiency?
2) Is the Toyota Passo 1300 cc better than the Vitz?
3) Is the Nissan Tiida 1490cc a good car to drive and is it fuel-efficient?
4) When importing the above cars from Japan, is it okay to buy cars with mileage above 87,000 kilometres or will they break down?
Andy

1. The 1000cc car is better in fuel efficiency if you are using it in the city. The 1300 will be more appropriate for extended highway use.

In this era of the NTSA and its sometimes mind-boggling speed limits, you might be better off with the 1000cc car. You might not need the extra 300cc, especially if your car does not bear loads that extend beyond your person.

2. Better in what way? The Vitz might be the better car overall.

3. Yes, it is a good car to drive, although the 1500cc version feels a bit underpowered. But remember the NTSA and its speed limits, so you do not exactly need a very powerful Nissan car to drive around the country.

4. They will break down. However, being Japanese cars, this breakdown will happen later rather than sooner. The good thing is, a car with an odo reading above 87,000km will obviously be cheaper than one with lower mileage.

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Hello Sir,
I am a young hustler whose father uses a Toyota Fielder 1400cc 2006 model. I admire the vehicle for its fuel efficiency, stability, and comfort.

I want to buy a vehicle for myself and would like a fuel-efficient one (like the Fielder). My favourite models are the Fielder, Avensis, and Allion. Kindly advise.
Thanks, and I appreciate your work. John Maina

Well, now that you are already familiar with the Fielder, it will not hurt if you get one of your own, will it? The consumption figures are not very much different with the Avensis and the Allion, but there is comfort in familiarity.

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Dear John,
It was a cold day in Wolfsburg, Germany, when your current car, the Mazda Demio, won the World Car of the Year in 2008, its heyday.

However, in true German fashion, the VW board summoned their engineers and ordered them to create the finest hatchback floorpan in the automotive world and wipe the smug smile off the faces of the Japanese Demio makers.

Money was no object. The result was the VW Golf Mark 5, each built carefully in 50 hours bristling with innovation, with a Euro NCAP 5-star rating to boot, which was promptly crowned World Car of the Year 2009.

Richard Hammond, a Top Gear presenter, even had a Mark 5 Golf struck by 600,000 volts of nature’s finest lighting while seated inside as a testament to its German over-engineering.

However, the fly in the ointment and let-down to many Kenyan motorists who ship the used version of this car from Japan is the DSG gearbox which, in simple terms, is two separate manual gearboxes (and clutches), contained within one housing and working as one unit.

It was designed by Herr and was initially licensed to the Volkswagen Group. Designed to shift gears more smoothly than a conventional manual gearbox and quicker than your reflexes, this automated manual gearbox resulted in a worldwide recall by VW of 1.6 million sold vehicles.

This has caused grief to many a Golf Mark 5 owner, who experience intermittent transmission jerking, usually at low speed, and agonising delays in shifting down once the car has warmed up. VW has finally figured out the cause after a lot of head scratching since the computer does not produce any fault codes.

Apparently, the DSG transmission has a protection mechanism switch built in that prevents excessive power from being delivered to it if the brakes are engaged.

When you take your foot off the brake and step on the accelerator for power, the switch lags and makes the transmission tranny think the brakes are still on, resulting in the annoying shifting delays. Once this brake switch sensor is replaced, the fly is removed from the German ointment.

As a preventative measure, it is also worthwhile to drain all the synthetic gearbox oil from the Golf Mark 5 with a DSG gearbox  and replace it with a good quality mineral oil before making the maiden trip from Mombasa port to Nairobi as VW has confirmed during recalls that in hot climates, the synthetic oil causes short circuits in the gearbox power supply due to build-up of sulphur, a scenario absent in the frigid testing grounds of Wolfsburg.

Lots of innovations remain true to form, like the fuel stratified injection (FSI) engine in the Golf Mark 5 gem in increasing fuel economy in tandem with power, and is kinder to the environment and better built than the Toyota D4 and Mitsubishi GDI employing similar engine concepts. The only catch is to ensure that no adulterated fuel ever enters the filler cap.

The ultimate Golf mark 5 innovation has to do with safety, giving it a Jekyll and Hyde personality; a safe family car packed with curtain airbags, ESP wizardly, and doors like a steel safe to ferry the children to summer camp when needed to a non-turbo Impreza and Evo thrashing hatchback when provoked by their loud exhausts on the way back home to a classy, yet frugal transporter to work on Monday.

Truly, the Golf is the car you will ever need, even in the land where the car in front is always a papier-mâché Toyota. VW fan club member

This is very enlightening. And yes, the Golf is a marvellous car; too bad about the DSG. Impressive gearbox, this one, if a little glitch-prone. I would still have me a pukka three-pedal, six-on-the-floor Golf (GTI, to be specific) if I had the inclination.

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Kindly tell me how a Toyota D4 engine is different from that of other Toyotas and how I can achieve maximum performance.
Also, what is its consumption (km/petrol) rate?

Toyota’s D4 engine is different from (some) others in that it uses direct injection rather than port injection. Direct injection is where the fuel is delivered directly into the cylinders of the engine, where it mixes with air and is then ignited by the spark plug.

This is at variance with previously established systems of port injection, in which fuel was injected/fed into the intake port, where it mixes with air before being delivered into the engine’s cylinders.

Achieving maximum performance is simple. Use high-octane (and reputable) fuel and stomp on the accelerator pedal as hard as you can. The fuel consumption varies, depending on the size of the engine and the size of the vehicle bearing that engine.

D4 engines are quite economical. However, when maximising performance, do not expect the fuel consumption to be impressive.

Posted on

If you’re looking for a car simply to ferry your bikes, Avensis is fine

Hi Baraza,
Great work in your column. I am an avid cyclist and have been looking for a car that will help me get my bike(s) from point A to point B without having to completely dismantle them.

This would probably mean a roof-mounted bike carrier or an estate car with lots of boot space, with the rear seat up or folded.

I have been considering the Avensis estate but after your review of 30 July, I am growing cold feet. Given that I need the car mostly just to car pool with fellow cyclists while heading for rides, what would you advise?
IKG

How bad was the review of 30 July? I believe my opening statement was “Get the Avensis…”, though I admit I later changed my mind and told my inquisitor to just get a Mark X for reasons completely unrelated to ferrying bicycles.

All you want is to ferry bicycles, right? Looking good at the local eatery or making your neighbours envious is not the priority here, is it?

Nor are RWD dynamics, wheelspin capability, tiptronic-style controlled lock-up automatic transmissions, and V6 power, correct?

I believe I recommended the Mark X for the following reasons: fun to drive, it is bigger, faster, prettier, better specced, and more imposing.

None of these things matter when you are heading to a cycle track for some furious pedalling action, so I would say there is not any black mark against the Avensis here. Get the Avensis.

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Baraza,
I recently bought a Subaru Legacy 2007 wagon. It is a super lovely car, except for the few occasions when I have to use a rough road — which is not often — and experience ground clearance problems.

I have had lots of suggestions, including one that I should have bought an Outback (true, but not really useful advice at this point).

Anyway, between spacers (I have been told they affect stability and could create potential insurance issues), larger wheels (been told this spoils the AWD), and putting up with the occasional knock, what would be the best thing to do?
MN

This is a situation where the ball is more in your court than mine. Of those three options, choose the one that suits you best, though I would opt for spacers as the path that leads to fewest complications.

Provided the increase in loftiness does not border on the ridiculous, you should be safe both from the gremlins of instability and the scrutinising gaze of the insurance agent.

Larger wheels do not necessarily affect the AWD system, unless the wheels are all of different sizes, which, while absurd and unbelievable, some people do.

Those people had hell to pay when the AWD went bonkers on them at the very moment it should have come in handy (this was during the recce of last month’s Murang’a time trial event where one of the hopefuls spun out not once, but twice, during some cornering manoeuvres).

The larger wheels will, however, gear up your transmission, watering down the torque and dialling back the acceleration somewhat. To these options you could add this: avoid rough roads altogether.

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Hello Baraza,
Thanks for your article of 23 July regarding the Evo X and Subaru STI. You did justice by whipping the ignorance out of the Subie fanatics.

I do not know what gets into their heads when they are behind the wheel. Save for noisy exhausts, which Subie drivers mistake for power and speed, the less noisy Evo X beats them hands down, period.

I even gave one such Subie owner a run for his money with my lesser-known Lexus LS460 without turbo, which easily tops 200km/h in less than seven seconds.

Away from that, kindly review the 2014 Hyundai Equus Ultimate and advise whether I can go for it or still go for the 2014 LS460-L.
Regards
JM

Your Lexus might be fast, but I think you are taking liberties with statistics. Zero to 200 km/h in seven seconds? That is Bugatti Veyron territory. Maybe you meant 0-100?

I cannot properly review the Hyundai Equus for two reasons, the obvious one being I have never driven one. The second reason is I do not think it is relevant to this market.

That said, the Lexus LS460-L is the better car overall, seeing how Lexus effectively invented this segment (a pocket-friendly alternative to the German threesome of the Mercedes S Class, BMW 7 Series, and Audi A8).

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Hello Baraza,
God bless you for your informative, educative, and occasionally entertaining articles.

I drive a 2004 Toyota Surf with a 1KZ-TE engine. Due to its age and frequent failures of the turbo system, my mechanic has proposed removing the turbo system, essentially reducing it to a 1KZ-T engine.

Obviously, there will be loss of torque (343 to 295 Nm) and power (96 to 85 kW), but probably a gain in fuel consumption. My question is, what other effect will the removal of the turbo system have on the engine in terms of life, maintenance, etc.

Will the effort be worthwhile or should I continue struggling with a failure-prone turbo system?

Besides the obvious drop in torque and power figures, I do not think there will be any other drastic effect with the removal of the turbo.

The only other downside is directly associated with the reduced strength: the vehicle will be slow, very slow.

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Hello Mr Baraza,
I must start by appreciating the great job you are doing in your column. I read the column religiously and have found it quite helpful. I have two questions:

1. I recently imported a second-hand Toyota Premio 1500cc Petrol Autodrive, which I use to travel from Nairobi to Nyeri and back every week.

Somewhere on the speedometer there is an indication of what I believe is the distance covered per litre of fuel (km/ltr).

There are times when the figure is as high as 21km/l; the highest it has ever been is 21.6km/l. My question is, do these figures really indicate the consumption rate and if so, does it mean my Premio is that fuel-efficient?

2. I come from a remote part of Laikipia County where roads look like the surface of the moon and my Toyota Premio cannot manage such terrain.

I have been planning to get an affordable car which can comfortably manage the off-road terrain. The car I have in mind is the Daihatsu Terios (similar to the ones used by Kenya Power). My questions in this regard are:

1. Is it really a good off-road car?
2. Can one get one with a capacity of around 1500cc?
3. Is it a reliable car and are spares readily available?
Kindly advise me on anything else I need to know about it.
Kariuki S.W.

Greetings,
Yes, the Premio is that efficient. However, there is something you should be careful about: does that readout give the instantaneous economy figure or an average over a certain distance?

Do not be fooled into thinking that 21 km/l is the average consumption unless you have some special skill you use (which is both possible and probable).

In realistic driving conditions (factoring in town driving, acceleration from bumps, and the moonscape terrain close to your destination), anything between 11 km/l and 15 km/l on average is the norm for a Premio, but you could still achieve 21 km/l overall if you are something else.

So, yes, the Premio is that efficient (for a while, depending on what you are doing).

1. Yes.
2. Yes.
3. Yes.

The car is small and cramped inside, is a bit uncomfortable, especially on rough terrain where the ride is very bouncy and jars a little, does not corner properly due to its tall and narrow dimensions, and on the open road, it is badly affected by crosswinds, especially at speeds of 100km/h or more.

The gearing is short, so at those highway speeds, you could add noisiness (boom) from the engine to the battle with the wind on the list of crosses to bear.

The car is small inside because it is small outside, so this makes it nippy and easy to tool around town, squeezing into small spaces, and parking.

The small exterior measurements and well-nigh non-existent overhangs means it will tackle a surprising array of obstacles without grounding itself or even damaging the bodywork. Just steer clear of the versions with a body kit, though, because it completely undoes the benefits I just mentioned.

The short gearing allows it to ascend slopes of extreme severity without having to redline the engine, which is small and could potentially be a handful in the clag unless you mercilessly stomp the accelerator constantly.

This small engine, coupled with the small body, combine to create good fuel economy for what is essentially a pint-sized SUV. Just try not to go beyond 100km/h; you will not like it.

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Hi Barasa,
I am a 30-year-old newly married man with an expectant wife. I am looking for a family car that my wife and I would both be comfortable driving.

My options are the Mazda Demio, Mazda Verisa, Toyota Runx, Toyota Allex, and VW Golf. I have a budget of Sh500,000. Please also advise me whether to import or buy one locally.
Richard

Hi Richard,
Congratulations on your recent nuptials and all the best in married life.

I would normally have recommended a Demio, simply because I drive one, but the Verisa is a more practical car for a family man. The Demio is smaller and, therefore, less practical. So the Demio bows out of the list.

The Runx and the Allex are the same car, the difference is that one model comes with chrome side mirrors and door handles while the other comes with body-colour accoutrements.

That is it. This difference is so trivial that I am not even sure which car is lashed with chrome and which one is not, but the two are just the same car.

When these model was trending not too long ago, they cost quite a tidy sum for a vehicle so puny, so they might not represent the best value for money.

People paid a lot for them. Given Kenyans and their attitudes towards Toyota, depreciation (or the lack thereof) will not make things any better, so for Sh500,000 you will not get a vehicle in as good a condition as a Verisa costing Sh500,000.

The Golf will also not cost Sh500,000. A Golf going for that amount is more likely than not either really old (a mid-90s car) or knackered and in the throes of death. Putting it right is something you and the (new) missus might regret, as parts are costly and the labour prohibitive.

Dealer mark-ups are a manifestation of the personal greed that has afflicted modern society. Some cars are commanding as much as 80 per cent dealer mark-ups, depending on demand and vehicle model. This is the sole reason you should import the vehicle yourself instead of visiting a sales yard.

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Hi Baraza,
I will skip the compliments because I am sure many have already told you that you are doing a good job.

I plan to buy a Mazda Axela (Mazda 3). I have checked online reviews and they are encouraging. The driving experience is said to be excellent.

One thing that keeps popping up, though, is road noise. Mazdas are said to be noisy and even for the Axela, they had to firm up the suspension to reduce the noise.

I know you have driven the Demio and possibly other Mazdas on Kenyan roads. How is the noise? Is it tolerable? Please also comment on the Bose Audio system.

Hello,
Feel free to dish out the compliments; they will be accepted both graciously and gleefully.

This issue about road noise could be specific to some markets. Methinks the road noise people lament about could be tyre roar, which can be reduced by simply pumping up the tyres some more or changing brands.

The road noise could also be wind noise, especially around the A and B pillars, but this is more common in cars with steeply raked windscreens such as SUVs.

I drive a Mazda and nope, I do not experience any untoward noises (unless I am gunning for the red line, in which case the only noise is the induction rasp and sub-tenor howl from the engine bay).

I cannot picture exactly how firming up the suspension reduces road noise, but if they claim it helped, then bully for them. The Mazda 6 I tested two years ago did have a Bose sound system, and it was thumping.

It also had USB capability, Bluetooth, mp3, CD, and… well, it worked. I liked it.

I am not as good at reviewing car radios as I am at reviewing cars themselves, but the setup was easy to fathom, the sound was clean (and loud enough for my taste), and the diversity of playable media means you might have to go back 30 years in time and get an 8-track cartridge before you come across something it will not play.

Posted on

Is the Toyota Avensis a fuel guzzler?

Hi Baraza,

I am regular reader of your column and appreciate the work you are doing. Kudos. Well, I am importing Toyota Avensis for my wife. It is a 2006 model with 2400cc. However a friend tells me it is a fuel guzzler. What is its consumption? Can Toyota Kenya service it and are spares readily available?

Best regards,

Roberto

The next time somebody tells you a car is thirsty, more so a small saloon from Toyota, ask them not to stop talking, to please go on and explain credibly how they arrived at that conclusion.

The Avensis is not thirsty. If they claim it is, I do not know what they will say about things like Mark X’s or Lexus LS430, which are also saloons from Toyota.

Expect up to 15 kpl on the highway, depending on the engine size, whether or not there is direct injection, and type of fuel. City use would hover in the 8-10 kpl range; again depending on where in the city you are driving.

Toyota Kenya can service the vehicle. Whether or not they actually will is entirely up to them: apparently some local franchises eschew vehicles bought off-shore or that were not previously from them. Toyota Kenya, hopefully, is not one of them.

Posted on 1 Comment

Can I drive my Toyota Mark X without the oxygen sensors?

Hi Barasa,

I have owned a Toyota Mark X, 2005 model for six months. Last week, it started showing the check engine light. A diagnostic revealed one of its oxygen sensors had stopped functioning. Is it ok to still drive it?

A lot of Mark X have these problems. Also, when I press on the brakes, it makes a ticking noise. I have put genuine brake pads but the problem persists. A mechanic told me it is the front shocks that have leaked and are causing the noise. Please advise,

Mark X owner

It is not okay to keep driving when one or more of the oxygen sensors is malfunctioning. There is the real and present danger of the catalytic convertor getting damaged or clogged in the process.

When you finally have to replace one of these, you will wish that you had taken care of the oxygen sensors.

With a failed sensor, the engine control unit (ECU) can’t tell whether or not the car is effectively burning its fuel and cannot thus adjust the timing accordingly.

What happens is that a good amount of unburnt hydrocarbons make their way to the cat and from there… clogging. Premature replacement or unclogging, can cost a pretty figure.

Just get a new sensor. Maintenance, replacements and repairs are part of motor vehicle ownership, much in the same way that when one has a child, school fees and medical bills are part of the deal.

The ticking noise under braking could be anything. A more definitive description would make it easier to narrow down on probable causes.

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Hi Baraza,

My car has been consuming vast amounts of coolant lately. I thought it was normal until one evening when the fan belt refused to stop. My mechanic advised me to disconnect the battery terminal.

The next day as I was driving to the mechanic at CMC, I noticed cloudy substance spewing out. I stopped and checked. The coolant container was empty, with the lid thrown out.

Surprisingly, the temperature gauge on the dashboard was reading normal. I let it cool, poured lots of water and drove to the mechanic, who on inspection said the coolant was leaking from the thermostat and some other pipes. I am about to replace the thermostat, but I wish to know the following:

1. How could this leakage have started?

2. What would have been the likely outcome if I never discovered the leakage early enough?

3. What are the possible remedies to prevent future leaks?

4. Water, red or green coolant; which one is preferred?

5. Could the tempereture gauge on the dashboard have been faulty and the reason it didn’t show that the engine was heating up?

Ben

Let me guess, the vehicle in question is a MK 1 Freelander, right? The very early pre-facelift examples, right? They were not a manifestation of Land Rover’s finest moment, having come into production when the Rover Group was facing imminent death (and was subsequently rescued by BMW). Anyway:

1. This is a CSI-type question because the exact source of the problem cannot be determined without dismantling the cooling system. However, the Freelander MK 1 was engineered in a hurry and on a shoestring budget, so build quality was not one of its strong points. Nor was reliability.

The research that went into material science is sketchy at best, and attention to detail must have been placed under a management team full of ADHD sufferers.

About 136 different faults were discernible on any car that left the factory, ranging from searing drive-shafts that rendered the car FWD only, to seizing power-steering pumps and upholstery that somebody forgot to drill HVAC holes into.

UK dealers were secretly asked to take a knife and cut holes into the fabric/leather dashboard and panel linings for the front and rear windscreens. Otherwise, the demisters would not work. If such an obvious thing as an outlet for the heater/AC was forgotten or shoddily executed, what then would you expect to happen when the engineering team started handling complex systems like the cooling and transmission?

The cause could be a blockage, a poorly strapped cooling pipe, a circlip that was left unfastened, a bolt omitted, a hole somewhere… or they simply did not take time to find out how long the cooling system would last before the fan got a mind of its own and blew the coolant cap off its moorings. It is really is hard to tell.

2. Overheating is what would have occurred, and from there it is a probability tree of various disasters depending on your luck. Your menu would have had options like blown head gaskets, warped cylinder heads and compression leakage. Further down the tree, you would be facing an engine seizure or a bonnet fire that could easily consume your vehicle if it went on long enough.

3. You need a complete overhaul of your cooling system. This is where I’ll ask you to subscribe to Land Rover Owner magazine because there is a wealth of information in there, specific to your vehicle. I have never overhauled the cooling system of a Freelander before, and even if I had, the process is too long and detailed to get into here. The general exercise involves replacing OEM hoses and pipes with units that are:

i) Made of better material and,

ii) possibly of larger diameter.

A new water pump is also typically added to the list as might a radiator core, and of course the offending thermostat replaced with something more trustworthy.

If there are any modifications to be made, that LRO magazine from the UK will be of more help than me.

4. The colour of coolant is hardly a selling point of any brand. Just use manufacturer-recommended coolant mixed with water.

5. About the temperature guage, the answer is yes, and also no. The temperature gauge is calibrated to indicate a certain range of temperature. There is a slight possibility that the car boiled away its coolant at temperatures within the “normal” range. With the filler cap blown off and the thermostat leaking, you don’t need a hot engine to quickly run out of coolant.

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Hi Baraza,

Your column is a must read for me.

Thanks for the good work. I am want to my first car and due to budgetary constraints, I am focusing on a used subcompact. My top considerations are fuel efficiency, reliability, longevity and ease of maintenance.

With these factors in mind, please help me choose between Mazda Demio, Honda Fit and Mitsubishi Colt, all 2006, 1300cc engines.

If you were in my shoes which of the three would you buy? What other small cars would you recommend? Finally, is it possible to get locally assembled, tropicalised versions of the three cars?

John

There is not much to split these three cars on whatever criteria you are asking about. However, if I was in your shoes, I’d buy a Colt R, simply because that thing is very, very quick. With that haste, away goes comfort and fuel economy.

The Demio is also a joy to drive, but I’ve tried the punchy 1.5cc. The 1.3cc could be underwhelming.

An untuned Honda Fit is the car for a person who lacks imagination. I know, I have not really answered your question but refer to my first statement: cars of this size are very similar irrespective of manufacturer.

Another way of looking at them, if you really have to pick one, is this: the Colt shares a platform with the Smart car, which in turn is a joint project between Mercedes-Benz and Swatch, the Swiss chronometer assembly masters. So you could cheat yourself that it is a Benz. However distant the relationship (and it is very, very distant). The Mazda Demio also has some Ford DNA in it. The Honda is a Honda, full stop.

Again, I know this is of no help at all, but for the third time: it is not easy to split these cars on characteristics other than pricing and specs. And the fact that you are looking at vehicles built seven years ago, these are moot points.

Those two qualities will vary greatly depending on who is selling them to you and where that person got them in the first place.

A small car I would recommend is even more irrelevant than the useless nuggets of information I have just given above.

A Fiat 500 looks like a good drive, and a Mini is most definitely a hoot to drive, but these will cost you, and I may not have an answer when you inevitably come back asking where to get spares for them.

Unfortunately for you, none of these cars were assembled locally, nor was there any franchise that sold them new in Kenya. So forget about tropicalisation.

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Hi Baraza,

Thanks for the very informative responses that you give every week about motoring. Between an Isuzu TFR single cab and a Toyota Hilux single cab, which has lower maintenance costs and would be best suited in an agricultural business? And which one would be advisable to purchase between petrol engine and diesel engine?

Which of the two is more durable and has better resale value in the event that I considered reselling at a later date.

Andrew
Any of the two pick-ups would do well in agri-business. They are both powerful. They will both lug heavy loads. They have good ground clearance, large payload areas and are both available in either 2WD or 4WD.Maintenance: If we are strictly referring to a TFR, then it will cost more to run because it is an older vehicle and is more likely to break down because it will be used.

However, if you are referring to the DMAX, then as new vehicles, both that and the Hilux will be covered by warranty. If and when the warranty runs out, then word on the street is that Hilux parts cost more but break less often. Do the math.

I advise in favour of a petrol engine simply because they last longer. Diesel engines are a bit fragile, especially with poor care; and these two pickups are nowadays available with turbodiesel engines, which require special handling to avoid early failures. If you can get a naturally aspirated diesel Hilux, go for that one. The advantage of diesel engines is that the fuel economy is amazing…. in a good way.

Durability is relative: This depends on how you treat the vehicle. But by sheer force of reputation, the Hilux wins this. The car will simply not break. This also applies to resale value.

**********

Hi Baraza,

I am interested in buying a car for personal use. I do about 400km a week. I am interested in a fuel efficient, easy to maintain and comfortable car to ride in. I have identified two cars, a VW Golf plus 2006 1.6 FSI and Toyota Corolla NZE 1500cc in terms of build quality, reliability, safety, comfort, fuel consumption and ease of maintenance. which of the two cars do you recommend.

In addition any suggestion of an alternative to the above cars is welcome. My friends are urging me to consider the Toyota Avensis or Premio, but I do not fancy them. I would like an expert opinion.

Douglas

Golf Plus vs NZE Corolla, eh? From your first requirements (fuel efficient, affordable and comfortable), the vote swings to Golf (but this depends on driving style and environment).

The NZE, while not exactly a bed of rocks, lacks the refinement of the German hatchback and crashes a bit over potholes, so it loses out on comfort. It is, however, cheaper (or easier) to buy and maintain.

Your other requirements are more about expounding of those three. Build quality is unmatched in Volkswagen products, ever since one can remember. The Japanese simply cannot hold a candle to the Germans when it comes to building solid, well-put-together cars.

Incidentally, both these vehicles started out as “world cars” for their respective manufacturers, but while the Corolla stayed true to its roots, the Golf has been inching steadily upmarket with every model change. You cannot creep upwards without raising your standards respectively.

Reliability would also theoretically look like an even split between the two, but the complaints against the Golf, more so regarding the automatic gearbox, are coming thick and fast. You might be better off with the manual.

Fuel economy depends on how you drive, and where. And what you carry in the car with you. Both engines have clever-clever tech, Toyota brags with its VVT-i system while VW’s Fuel Stratified Injection (the FSI in the name) is as close to magic as one can possibly come. It works wonders. In a controlled environment, the NZE would win because it has a smaller engine and it is lighter. Ease of maintenance: The Corolla, obviously.

***********

Hi Baraza,

I bought it recently from a friend. It’s a 2000cc YOM 2005, VVTi engine and fully loaded. Its from Japan but seems intended for European Market since my friend shipped it from Germany, where he was working.

I’m comfortable with its performance especially on the highways, but I believe it is not economical on shorter distances and in the Nairobi jams.

Kindly advice on the following:

1. Does this model of Toyota rank as a hybrid,

2. How would you compare its performance and features to the Fielder, Caldina and Premio within the same cc range in terms of maintenance?

3. It has a GPS mechanism with a display unit programmed in Japanese. Is there a place in Kenya (preferably in Nairobi) where this can be re-programmed to the local co-ordinates?

Eric

The subject field in your e-mail says Toyota Avensis, so I am guessing this is the car in question, and not a Toyota Prius. So:1. No, it is not a hybrid. Hybrid cars have more than one type of propulsion system/power source in them, hence the term hybrid.

In most cases it is fossil fuel and electricity — for example an electric motor that is either charged or supplemented by a small petrol/diesel engine.2. Performance and features are very similar to the others, especially the Premio.

The Fielder may be just a little bit more basic than the Avensis. Maintenance is also broadly similar.3. I am still looking for someone competent enough to do the installation.

Posted on

The Toyota Avensis is just a Premio in high heels

Hi Baraza,

I plan to import my first ever-car in the course of this year. My preference is a 1.8-litre Toyota Premio or Avensis, both VVT-i saloons. These two cars seem to cost almost the same and I like their shape.

I have heard people say the Avensis’ engine is troublesome and not easy to fix locally. Is it true that the D4 engine is a pain in the neck?
The reason I need a car is that I am venturing into consultancy, which will involve a lot of travel around town and beyond.

I also need something that will take me to my rural village in western Kenya. Which car would you advise me to go for, considering performance, efficiency, and general cost of maintenance?

Leon Lussac.

These two cars are so similar I would say close your eyes, throw a stone, and the vehicle that gets hit is the one to buy. However, Toyota Kenya does have a bit of experience with the Avensis, given that they sold them brand-new once. Also, Toyota Kenya says they can fix D4 engines, so both the Avensis and the Premio D4 can be maintained there.

I would speak against the Avensis for one reason. The speedometer will most likely be in mph, seeing that the car is most likely ex-UK (where they are built), and I dislike those crowded speedometers with huge, widely spaced numbers that go up to 110 (the crowding comes from the smaller circle that is the speedometer in km/h).

For the Premio, if you get one with the telematics screen, the writing will be in Japanese and, sooner rather than later, you will write back to me asking if I know how to — or anybody who — translate(s) them into English, and I will have to tell you no.

Throw a stone. Or buy the Avensis…

**********

Hi,

I recently ordered a fifth-generation Toyata Hiace from Japan, a 2006 model of the following specifications: Chassis #KDH200-0037737. Engine capacity: 2,500cc. Transmission: Automatic. Fuel: Diesel. Mileage: 198,000 kilometres.

I would like to know whether there is something in particular I need to be cautious about to ensure longevity. I intend to use it as a matatu.

Regards,

Alex

The initial (and subsequently repealed) ban on 14-seater matatus came just when these vehicles had started getting into the market, so not very many found their way into public service. The few that did seem to be operating quite well. Most became ambulances and/or private business transport.

The only thing I would advise (so far) to be careful about is the turbo. The old Shark was not turbocharged, so not many “veteran” drivers may know that turbocharged engines require slightly different (and more careful) handling compared to naturally-aspirated engines.

Let your driver (if it will not be an owner-driver situation) know that he should give the engine about 2-3 minutes of warm-up after cranking before he loads it up, or rather takes off in typical matatu style. Whenever he stops, he should also give the engine (the turbo, actually) a cool-down period of 2-5 minutes depending on how hard he has been driving. That way the turbo will last longer.

Use proper oil and make sure the cooling system is up to par at all times. Turbo engines generate tremendous amounts of heat.

***********

Hi Baraza,

Hope you are keeping well. I wish to get your input on the Golf (2.0GT). I had plans to import a second-hand one from Japan or Europe. But a friend, who drives one, has pointed out that his car has a gearbox problem; the transmission makes a loud cranking noise when shifting from second to third.

My mechanic has also advised me against buying the Golf, citing transmission issues. How come those who inspect these cars prior to importation fail to pick out this defect?

I like this car, but after my friend was slapped with a Sh350,000 repair bill for this Golf, I am a bit discouraged. Could you kindly share with me — and other Golf enthusiasts — any information you may have regarding this car? Is it reliable, for instance? Or does it require particular care?

Thanks,

James.

Usually, the pre-export inspection does not include a road test, and it is hard, nay, impossible to tell that an auto-box makes a noise when shifting from second to third without the vehicle actually moving. If the car passes the physical test, then too bad for the subsequent buyer.

Also, most of these new-fangled vehicles are chock-full of electronics and are built with millions of different parts. This makes them delicate.

This is my thinking: The vehicle is not brand-new, right? It may have seen several (four to seven) years of service in its country of origin. The service may have been hard, or even abusive, though not enough to show at a quick glance.

Maybe these Golfs have, as one of their idiosyncrasies, a gearbox whose seals wear out after a certain mileage or period. So the previous owner gives up the car, but at a point where he cannot tell that it is on the verge of going on the fritz.

The vehicle spends three months on the high seas, during which time there might be a leakage of ATF. The vehicle gets here with a slightly lower ATF level than it left the country of origin with.

A quick drive may not reveal a problem. But after a 487-kilometre drive, usually on the northern end of the rev counter (everybody driving an import from Mombasa always seems to be impatient), what would have been a minor hiccup grows bigger. More ATF leaks. Heat warps components.

The pressure wears the seals out some more. But the car still arrives in Nairobi, again slightly worse off than it left the coast.

As you can see, this is a downward spiral that begins at the point where people buy cars that they cannot see.

I would also like to get feedback from other Golf users out there. I have a friend who also imported a Golf that developed gearbox issues not very far from Nairobi on his way from Mombasa, so the car completed the trip on the back of a truck. He, however, is the exception. His car was doing fine until he hit a rock while trying to dive out of the way of a wayward juggernaut.

**********

Hello,

I am curious about these fuel-saving things that you pour into your fuel tank. Do you think that they, in anyway, transform the normal Unleaded to something like Shell’s V-Power? Could you kindly do me a favour and dig into what they are all about?

They are readily available at various motor boutiques in the country.

And, by the way, thank you for your educative pieces.

They are called octane boosters and they do transform normal fuel into something like V-Power in that they increase the octane rating of the fuel, making it suitable for engines with high compression ratios or running high-boost forced induction.

Otherwise, these engines would knock, or go into “safe mode”, where the timing is retarded and peak power is cut so that your former road rocket gives the performance of a donkey on its death bed.

However, the fuel, as you said, turns into “something like V-Power”, it does not become V-Power, which has so many other additives over and above the octane, and these additives act as cleaning agents, which octane boosters do not have.

Octane boosters boost the octane level of your fuel, they do not boost performance. So if your car can run properly on normal Unleaded, octane boosters are unnecessary.

Most of the cars I know using octane boosters are heavily modified; using high compression ratios, high-lift/aggressive cams, and very high boost pressures in their turbos.

**********

Hello Baraza,

I follow your column religiously. (Just to ask, is your real name Kimani? Are you a former lawyer? Did you once teach business law in USIU? Do you have a Twitter account so I can follow you?)

Now, to my questions: I have a first-generation Subaru Legacy. Nice car, but, lately, because of age, I guess, the engine has started developing misses, which have, in turn, affected fuel efficiency. Is it the plugs or should I overhaul the engine altogether?

I am a bit old-school in my car choice, so kindly excuse me. But, believe me, the animal does wonders on the road. That is why changing to a newer model is a no-no for me, at least for now. I want to maintain this car for practical and aesthetic reasons. It stands out. I love it. Please do a feature on the RS Turbo soon, even though I know you prefer the trendy, later model.

I love your articles to bits! Keep writing.

So, are you Kimani?

Tollander Wabwire,

BD Officer.

No, my real name is not Kimani, and no, I am not a former lawyer. Also, no, I have never taught business law at USIU. Yes, I have a Twitter handle, @BarazaJM, which you can follow.

Now, to your old animal: Replacing an engine because of a miss is akin to divorcing your wife of many years because she forgot to prepare you dinner one night. There must be a good reason for that, just the same way engine misses have causes, all of which are treatable.

When a car engine develops a miss, these are the most probable causes:

1. Ignition system fault so that there is no spark in one or more cylinders. It is your theory that the plugs could be dead, but then again the plugs could be fine. Instead, the current could be lacking in the high-tension leads.

2. A cylinder has lost compression (compression leakage) which some people call blow-by. This is caused either by a leaking head gasket or worn out piston rings, and can be established by doing a simple compression test on all cylinders, then identifying the cause of leakage on the offending cylinder.

3. Dirty or clogged injectors/carburettor jets, which starve the engine of fuel. Easily curable by running injector cleaner through the fuel system. If this does not help, then the injectors may need repair/replacement

4. Dirty/clogged filters: check both the fuel filter and air cleaner for dirt/blockages.Getting a manual Legacy RS to drive is not easy. Those that have them will not willingly sell, nor will they willingly allow a person to drive their car unless they know that person very well (for example, where he lives or where his wife gets her hair done).

But as soon as I get the opportunity to give one a spin, the RS will get its 15 minutes on my page. And, no, I would actually pick a manual Gen-I BC RS over a BL5 any day.

So, I am NOT Kimani!

**********

Dear Baraza,

My Suzuki Aerio with DOHC-M15A engine, 1500cc, runs very well when cold, but on heating up, it starts to “jerk”, backfire, and eventually stalls. When that happens, I wait for 10 minutes before cranking it up again, after which it will run for about 10 kilometres before stalling again. And on and on and on. The engine coolant level is okay and the fan operates at 97 degrees Celcius.

I have had a computerised diagnosis test done on the car in motion and it did not return any errors. CMC refused to look into the problem since my car is a direct import, but I guess it is because they have not dealt with the make before.

This is despite the fact that there are many Suzuki vehicles with M15A engines, like Suzuki Jimny. What could be the problem? Do you have a solution?

Regards,

Kimari.

Your problem sounds like a clogged injector complication. And the symptoms are typical of misfiring (without the loud exhaust reports). If it is not a clogged injector, then maybe your spark plugs are on their deathbed and do not work properly when they get hot.

It was very “uncool” of CMC to dismiss you like that, but many have complained about them along the same lines of them not touching anything;

a) They did not sell or,

b) Someone else has had an attempt at maintaining.

I do not know how true this is, but it still is not a good thing for a garage to discriminate against potential clients.

Posted on

I’m moving back to Kenya, what car should I buy?

Hi Baraza,
Your column is like a special motoring university. Kudos! I am moving back to Kenya from the UK at the end of the year and intend to reward myself with a car after my studies.

I have identified the following used cars based on how much I want to spend (both cost here and tax in Kenya), age, and appeal: Toyota Avensis (most abundant but with unappealing dashboard), Mazda6, Vauxhall Insignia (gorgeous), Volkswagen Passat, Honda Accord, Dodge Caliber, Chevrolet Epica, Hyundai Sonata, and Tucson.

I want to spend about Sh10,000 a month on the car and do a maximum of 100 kilometres a week. Which would you recommend for consideration in terms of fuel efficiency, spares availability, Kenyan roads, my monthly budget, and being my first self-owned car?

NB: I do try to read the Daily Nation every day, but sometimes, as a student, I am sure you understand that the schedule just throws one off. So kindly copy me the response on e-mail.

Kind regards,

James.

Leave the Insignia, the Caliber, and the Epica alone if you want any form of confident support from this side. I can bet a large number of people do not even know what those are, let alone have the know-how to fix them when the need arises.

The Sonata, Accord, Passat, and Avensis are a better choice, but the problem is that you do not specify what model year these vehicles are.

Only the Passat will get support for the past three models, the Sonata and the Accord have only recently been formally introduced and it is my guess that current and future models will receive priority in support terms from the respective franchises, while past models may be overlooked.

If you choose backstreet Mr Fix-Its, well, good luck. My pick here would be the Passat B6 or B7. Not the B5, though. If you want to buy the Tucson, get the new one. The old one looked funny.

Hi Baraza,

Thanks for the informative articles. Please help me understand one issue. What is the relationship between the engine size (cc) and the gearbox? In other words, if I was able to put a jet engine in a tractor, would the tractor out-pace most cars on the road, not withstanding the aerodynamics?

Regards,

Ronald

With a jet engine on a tractor, you would not need a gearbox. All you would need is a reliable steering system and very good brakes (an added parachute has been found to be invaluable when stopping jet-powered ground vehicles).

This is because the jet engine works by pushing the entire vehicle using Newton’s Third Law of Motion: for every action there is a reaction equal in magnitude and opposite in direction. So the plasma stream of hot gases exiting the rear of the jet engine creates a force that pushes the jet/tractor in the opposite direction, enabling it to go forward.

Motor vehicle engines, the regular ones rather, exert force through the wheels of the vehicle through a transmission system of sorts. The whole setup is called the power-train and usually incorporates drive-shafts, transmissions, gearboxes, the engine itself, and the tyres. This is where you need a gearbox because the torque developed by the engine sometimes needs multiplication when the load increases.

Now, between the engine size and gearbox, there is definitely a relationship but the variables involved are numerous. The power and torque curves of the engine are the primary determinants of the ratios one uses in the gearbox.

Then there is application: are you designing a gearbox for a tractor that pulls tree stumps out of the ground or is the gearbox for a road car that is designed to break speed records? Engine size may or may not apply.

Here is an example American cars have very huge engines, typically in the 5.7-litre range. But these massive engines are built to drive everywhere at 88km/h while spooling lazily and effortlessly, sometimes towing a caravan or a speedboat if the 88 km/h drive is headed towards a holiday destination.

Then take a McLaren Mercedes SLR sports car, 5.5 litres (with a supercharger), which is smaller than the American equivalent, but will do almost four times the speed. Clearly, the gear ratios are dissimilar. At 88 km/h the SLR is going to be still in first gear.

Application and engine output characteristics (torque and power curves) directly determine the gear ratios in a gearbox more than engine size itself does. It is just that engine size again determines the torque and power, if everything else is kept constant, so that is how they are related. Indirectly.

Hi Baraza,

I would like you to shed some light on the interaction between brake horse power, torque, and engine rating. I am curious as to why a 2,000cc Evolution MR produces 400bhp yet a much bigger Mercedes Actros (2546) does 460bhp.

If a 2.0-litre engine can develop such a high HP, why do Mercedes, Ferrari, Lamborghini, and other super cars go to the length of making behemoth engines of 6,300cc and above that produce only 500bhp?

I once raced a Mercedes CLS 3500 CC (270bhp)) in a VW Golf GTI 2,000cc (200 bhp) and won. What do you attribute this to? Torque? A Range Rover Sport (2.7-litre) with 188bhp and 324.5lbs of torque easily wins against a GTI.

Thanks,

Anthony Mugo.

Brake horse power is the power of the car developed by an engine before losses occur in the transmission and peripherals (alternators, pumps, mufflers). It is not a very accurate way of determining the outright performance of a car. Wheel horse power is a much better indicator.

Torque is force applied over a certain distance, but to make it clear, it is what GETS you going. The effort needed to move a certain load, and determines the magnitude of load one can move as opposed to power, which is what keeps you going, the rate at which the force is applied and determines the absolute speed at which one can move.

For engine rating, see brake horse power. Now, the power output of an engine is directly related to the torque. An engine develops torque naturally. The power output is determined by how high that torque can be carried before the torque curve drops off.

That is the amount of rpm the engine keeps pulling with maximum force. An Actros develops massive torque, say 3000Nm or even more, but it revs to only 2500rpm. So power output is pegged at 460hp (this is still a lot, by the way).

The Evo, on the other hand, makes about 550Nm, but revs to 8,000rpm, hence the power is higher. I know of an Evo that makes, or made 820whp WITH A SLIPPING CLUTCH, but this particular Evo could rev to a stratospheric 9,000rpm.

Big engines with low-ish power outputs are unstressed and last longer. That is in direct contrast to small, high-strung engines with high outputs. They do not go far. That is why race cars go an engine a race.

About that VW vs CLS thing you are talking about: either the CLS driver was inept or he was concerned about wrecking his expensive saloon racing a hatchback. If he had chosen to open the taps on that CLS, you would have been blown out of the water.

Hello Baraza,

I am a fan of your articles and would like to figure out the problem with my car. It is Toyota RunX VVTi, a 2003 model that I have been driving for two years now. However, I started experiencing a problem when I changed tyres from the original ones (imported with the car).

I drive on two new front tyres and the original ones at the rear. The car vibration increases when the speed exceeds 80km/hr. The vibrations reduces when the new tyres are taken to the rear. I have done wheel balancing/alignment and the situation has not improved. What could be the problem?

Okomoli B.O.

You could be having directional tyres. Switching them front to back reduces the vibrations, right? So how about you switch them right to left? Some tyres are designed for use on one side of the car only, so placing them on the “wrong” side of the car creates an unpleasant driving experience.

I would also like to know what is the brand and size of the new tyres.

Hi,

My father has an S320 diesel import from UK registered in 2008. When you hit the 120kph mark, a hazard light appears on the speedometer. It says the ABS is not functioning. We have taken it to DT Dobie for diagnosis twice but it keeps coming back on and they keep charging him every time. He does not mind this, but I do. Do you have any idea what the issue is?

For a few months my father did not drive the car but the on-board computer says the car was due to be serviced, considering it has only travelled around 1,000km. Will anything happen to the car if he keeps driving it?

On a final note, when my father was importing the car, many of his friends, including DT Dobie staff, told him not to buy a diesel Mercedes, or a small diesel car for that matter, because the diesel in Kenya is not as pure as that in Europe. Is this true? For the past two years the car has been running smoothly, I think it is a myth.

Regards,

Victor.

Mercedes cars, more so the top-of-the-range S Class uber-saloon, cannot and should not be fixed by amateurs, driveway grease monkeys, or backstreet opportunists. Only approved dealers and franchises are supposed to handle the car.

So this is my advice: Go back to DT Dobie. Ask them to fix the car, if they cannot, let them be honest enough to say so. If they attempt to fix it and the results are unsatisfactory, inform them that you will not be paying, because why pay when the service you requested has not been delivered?

I do not know what usually happens when your Benz tells you it is due for service and you do not service it. Jeremy Clarkson of BBC Top Gear jokes a lot about that warning, but he has never said what will actually happen to the car. He just says “kooler, sree veeks” (three weeks in the cooler a.k.a jail), which is not very helpful. So I do not know. Service your car when it asks you to. It knows best when it needs attention.

The diesel allegation is mostly true, especially when it applies to Mercedes cars. But this is usually for small engines. The S320 CDI does not have a small engine, this is the same engine used in the ML320 CDI, a 3.2l 6-cylinder engine. It should not be much of a problem

Dear Baraza,

Kindly help me to choose between the new Honda CRV (2006-2007 model), Toyota RAV 4, and Mitsubishi Outlander in terms of price, availability of spare parts, durability/dependability, and fuel consumption.
Thanks,

Moses Mwanjala.

This is what my research yielded:

Price: I visited that website I keep mentioning, autobazaar.co.ke, and this is what I found. A 2007 CRV that costs Sh1.83 million on the lower side, and a 2006 (eh??) CRV that costs Sh2.5 million on the upper side. Actually there were two of these.

Toyota RAV4: As low as Sh1.49 million for a 2006 car, as high as Sh2.87 million for another car of similar vintage. Most were going for Sh2.5 million. Mitsubishi Outlander: As low as Sh2 million, as high as Sh 2.1 million. Most of them had “Contact Seller” on the price tag, and contact them you will. Autobazaar.co.ke not only gives you the cars available, there is also a map below the search results that shows you exactly where the car is at that moment. Nifty, eh?

Availability of spares: I did not do research on this because none of these cars is limited edition or custom made. They are mass produced by Japan. The answer to this is fairly obvious.

Reliability and durability: Honda’s V-TEC line of engines are nicknamed “Terminator” by foreign journalists because they never suffer engine failure. This is unlike Toyota’s D4 and Mitsubishi’s GDI, which are fickle by comparison. The RAV4 also seems to age a bit fast compared to the Honda. The Outlanders I have seen are mostly pampered vehicles, so it is hard to tell what would happen if one gets abused.

Fuel economy: This is where Toyota and Mitsubishi get their revenge. D4 and GDI yield astonishing economy figures, the D4 more so. But would you rather save fuel or suffer engine failure?

Dear Baraza,

As we speak, I am stuck between a rock and a hard place because I am planning to buy an expedition vehicle (something tough enough to withstand the harsh off-road world).

I have been looking at expedition vehicle videos and I realised that most of them go for vehicles with solid axles (Land Rover Defender, Toyota Landcruiser 70 series) as compared to independent suspension (Discovery 3, Hummer).

a) Why is this? b) What would you advise me to buy? Thanks.

Sunus.

First, solid axles are tougher, more robust, simpler in design, and consequently cheaper to buy, instal, and repair. In actual terms, you are better off with independent suspension because this helps in wheel articulation, increases stroke room per wheel (up and down travel), and helps keep the car balanced even in extreme situations.

However, independent suspensions are a bit more delicate, so they break easily and they cost more. So it is wiser to just grin and bear it with the solid axles if you are going to participate in the Rhino Charge.

Second, it depends on the extremity of your off-road activities and the wherewithal available to you. I could suggest you buy a Series III Land Rover 109 and raise its suspension only to find out I am talking to a billionaire who rarely goes over anything taller than a tree stump and is better off in the 2013 Range Rover.

Then again I may suggest you buy the Landcruiser 200 V8 but it turns out Sh15 million is too much money to splash on a new off-road car, and your budget can only stretch to a clapped out J70 pick-up from a police auction. So, how extreme is your off-roading and how much are you ready to spend on your off-roader?

Posted on

The Surf, good. The Montero, so-so. The Fortuner, ish-ish!

Dear Baraza,

Thanks for the incisive analyses.

I want to upgrade to a 4X4 but I am wondering which, between the Toyota Fortuner, the Toyota Surf and the Mitsubishi Montero Sport, I should go for. I have not driven any of them but they look quite capable. Kindly give me your views in terms of performance, handling, and operating costs (spares and fuel).

Regards,

Okumu.

In keeping with the theme of road tests promised but not delivered is the Pajero Sport, the new one. Since you call it a Montero Sport, I will guess you are talking about the old model, which some call the Nativa (most of these names depend on where you buy the car).

In terms of performance, I hope you do not mean speed, because these cars are not meant to be driven fast, except, maybe, for the Surf, which is a lot better than the other two on tarmac.

The Montero Sport (old model) used the power train from the L200 Warrior/Storm, and in a review I did on this car, I found the gear ratios to be mismatched with the engine characteristics.

The first three gears were too high, bogging down initial acceleration, and then the final two gears were too low, giving a noisy, thrashy, belligerent highway cruise, not to mention a poor top speed and unimpressive fuel economy.

Then again, in a car that tall, you don’t want to be going really fast, do you? The height and separate frame chassis puts some distance between this vehicle and the Lancer Evolution in handling terms, irrespective of the fact that they are both Mitsubishis. Don’t corner hard in it.

The Fortuner is very similar to the Montero in handling, except the ride is worse. It is uncomfortable. It also has a useless diesel engine that huffs and puffs and blows your patience down: to get any semblance of movement you need the petrol version. For that you sacrifice fuel economy: even the 2.7 VVT-i is quite thirsty.

These two cars are based on pickups, and therein lies the problem. Also, being cheaper than their elder siblings (the Pajero and the Prado), they seem aimed at the hardcore off-road enthusiast rather than the causal SUV-lover (this explains the unusual engine-gearbox relationship: it is more ideal for off-road than on-road).

And that is where the Surf comes in. The Fortuner is actually spiritual successor of the Surf, but the Surf is more comfortable, faster, smoother, more economical and is less likely to do a somersault through a corner. The diesel turbo engine also seems better suited to all conditions.

These are big 4×4 vehicles, so fuel economy will be scary if you opt for a petrol engine, and maintaining the turbo will be painful if you go for the diesel and don’t know what you are doing. 4X4 tyres are also generally more expensive than saloon car tyres.

Get the Surf. It even has a bigger boot!

**********

Hi Baraza,

I recently imported a 2005 Toyota Avensis fitted with a 2000cc D4-VVTi engine. Being my first ride, I must say it has been excellent, especially on highways and smooth roads. The ground clearance, however, is an issue when I have to do a bit of off-roading. My questions:

1. Other than my driving skills, how else should I protect the belly of the vehicle without compromising stability (don’t tell me to stay away from off-roads).

2. Other than normal servicing after covering particular mileage, are there any special pointers to look out for?

3. Other than Toyota Kenya, kindly recommend for me a mechanic I can depend on for minor maintenance, especially body works, though I intend to visit Toyota Kenya for engine-related issues.

4. There are Avensis’ made specifically for European markets and others for Japanese use. Which of these is superior, and are the parts and trims the same?

Regards,

JM.

1. You could under-seal the belly of the car. That is, install a sort of iron sheet, in the fashion of a sump guard, that goes all the way to the back of the car. I will not tell you to stay away from off-road, but I will tell you to try and get the right vehicle for it, if it is really off-road. I have noticed people have a tendency to refer to any untarmacked paths as “off-road”.

2. Not really. Just keep an eye on expendables (tyres, brakes, fluids), drive carefully, wash your car regularly and don’t be afraid to use Shell’s V-Power once in a while, especially with that D4 engine. Also, buy your fuel from reputable sources only.

3. I normally don’t refer people to mechanics outside of the franchise, so for now…. stick to Toyota Kenya.

4. The Avensis for the European market is called Avensis. The Avensis for the Japanese market is called Premio (not Avensis). They are essentially similar, though the Avensis (European) has a wider choice of engines, including diesel. When buying parts, just buy the model-specific stuff, don’t interchange, because there are certain items that might not be interchangeable.

**********

Hi Baraza,

My car, an 1,800cc, 2002 Toyota Fielder that has clocked 68,000 kilometres so far, makes a soft clicking sound when I start it in the morning. The noise comes from the front, but when I open the bonnet and listen I can’t locate it.

When I close the bonnet, it sounds as if the noise is coming from the front wheels. The noise disappears after driving for a few minutes, when, I guess, when the engine has become warm.

My mechanic told me to change the ATF, but that did not help. I have always used Total Quartz 7000 oil, the drive shaft and wheel joints are OK, the bushes are new, the choke clean and all shocks and engine mounts are in good condition.

Another mechanic suggested that it might be the bearing next to the water pump, and I am now confused! For your information, this problem came about after my friend borrowed the car for a 750-kilometre journey on bad roads. What might be the problem?

Sospeter.

Step 1 is to ask your friend what happened or what he did in the course of that 750-kilometre drive, and press upon him that honesty is a requirement, though I highly doubt he did anything untoward with the vehicle.

Noises are hard to diagnose without actually hearing them, and what makes your situation even more sticky is the fact that you can’t isolate the source of the noise. Soft clicking could be anything, it could even be a fan blade brushing against something.

It could be low oil pressure in the valve train (typical with a cold engine), it could be a loose or out-of-kilter belt, it could even be the bearing the other mechanic is talking about. Check everything, Sir.

**********

Dear Baraza,

My Toyota Wish has been showing the Check Engine light on and off. The light is very erratic and may come on after weeks. I have taken the car for diagnosis twice. The first time they changed the fuel filter but the light persisted. The second diagnosis did not show anything wrong. Please advise.

Thanks,

Robert.

Your car, I suspect, is fine; it is just that the ECU was not flushed after the diagnosis (and repair, I presume) was done. Disconnect the battery overnight and reconnect in the morning.

This typically flushes the ECUs of lesser Toyotas (after the problem has been solved, don’t just flush the ECU when the source of the Check Engine light has not been rectified).

However, first confirm that disconnecting the battery will not disorient your car. I have said it flushes the ECUs of lesser Toyotas, but I don’t know if the Wish is one of them. Sometimes disconnecting the battery creates a whole lot of complications with the ECU itself, resetting things and maybe calling for a reprogramming.

**********

Dear Baraza,

I really enjoy reading your weekly articles. Please keep up the good work. I have lived in Europe for a while now and I’m planning to come back home. I would like to purchase a Volkswagen Passat 2.0 TDI (diesel, turbocharged engine).

I think it’s the same models as those used by several ministries in Kenya (but again maybe those are FSI models). The car has a manual transmission, and I would like to know the following about it:

1. Is it easy to own a Volkswagen in Kenya, in respect to maintenance costs?

2. Which one is more economical, the TDI or the FSI?

3. Are there merchandise in Kenya for the Volkswagen?

4. What are the other Japanese models that equal the Passat, and are they available in Kenya?

Your advice will be truly appreciated.

Muiru.

1. It is not “easy”, but it is not particularly hard either. We have CMC Motors, who deal in Passats among other things. The government cars you see are FSI models, and I am not sure if they have any diesels in the fleet. I am also not sure if CMC will maintain a small diesel… especially an imported, non-tropicalised one.

2. TDI of course. Diesel engines are the sippiest of all sippy engines, though FSI and other direct injection petrol engines come really close. The diesel is still cheaper to fuel because diesel is cheaper here in Kenya than petrol, unlike some other countries.

3. Merchandise? Yes. We have Golfs, Polos, Passats, Touaregs, Jettas, Amaroks, we even have Volkswagen trucks and lorries; in fact what I have not seen around is the Phaeton uber-saloon. But I am guessing what you were really asking about is FRANCHISE, in which case the answer is also yes.

CMC Motors have the local Volkswagen franchise.

4. The Passat’s biggest Japanese rival is the Toyota Camry, which we have here in Kenya, but for some reason, Toyota Kenya have priced it out of the market: it costs more than an E Class Mercedes (asking price of Sh9 million as of February last year).

Other Japanese rivals are the Honda Accord (good car, this), but Honda is still establishing itself (again) in the country, so not much noise has been made about this car. From Nissan and Mitsubishi it is only import cars that would serve any real competition to the Passat (Teana and Galant/Diamante).

Local line ups at DT Dobie and Simba Colt do not have anything of that size. We also have the Mazda 6 (nice to drive, and looks sharp, costs about Sh3.85 million from CMC) and the Subaru Legacy (very big boot, looks weird and the 2.0 litre boxer without a turbo feels underpowered. It IS underpowered.

Costs about Sh5.5m at Subaru Kenya). A well-kept secret (until now) is the Hyundai Sonata. Very good car, well-specced, pretty and competitively priced to boot at Sh4.5m, though it is not Japanese.

And the government also has a few :-). My personal pick is the Mazda. It understeers a bit, but it feels the best to drive of the lot. It actually feels like a sports car, though the Tiptronic gate has been reversed and is counter-intuitive.

**********

Thanks for your very informative articles in the Daily Nation. Keep up the good work. I just realised that we went to Alliance High School the same year (Class of ‘02), from your Facebook page.

I recently bought a Toyota Mark X (2.5L), rear-wheel-drive, and it’s been giving me two major problems;

1. It skids a lot on wet surfaces (even on not-so-wet surfaces), and its traction control, unfortunately, offers little help. I noticed on the dashboard there is a light for 4WD; does this mean it has an option for 4WD? I believe this would reduce the skidding. How can I activate it? There is no button for it.

2. The ground clearance is so low and I am contemplating raising it a little bit using coil springs, but I have been advised that this would negatively impact on its stability and the electronically controlled shock absobers? What are your thoughts on this?

Hillary.

This is Hillary Kiboro, right?

1. The traction control SHOULD help. Is it on or off? And from the way you describe the situation, I think someone has a heavy foot. Either that or you may have bought an enthusiast’s car. Those Japanese tend to do funny things to cars, which include, but are not limited to, doing away with the traction control.

It is as simple as using a custom map in the ECU. I also suspect your car develops more than the 212bhp made by the stock 2.5 litre engine. You may have in your hands what we call a “sleeper”, an ordinary-looking vehicle with extra-ordinary firepower under the bonnet.

Saloon cars do not have deselectable 4WD like SUVs. The car itself decides how much power it channels to which axle, depending on circumstances. No driver influence is available.

The closest one can come to having deselectable 4WD in a saloon car is with the DCCD (driver controlled centre differential) in the Subaru Impreza WRX STi. If your car had 4WD when new and now behaves like a rear-drive drifting car, then I suspect the former owner also did away with the front drive shaft. He may have intentionally modified the Mark X to drift easily, which is what you are (unintentionally) doing.

2. In keeping with my suspicions that you have bought a drifting car is my other surmise: it may also have been lowered. Installing stock springs should help. If it is on stock suspension (which I doubt, because yours sounds like it has adjustable suspension), then taller springs will do. It will not affect the car adversely if the height increase is also not adverse.

Posted on

A case of bad laws, kamikaze drivers and fake Ferraris

Hi JM,

I have a motoring question, but not about cars. It’s about drivers, road safety and accident reduction. To exhort drivers to change behaviour has as much a chance of success as a snowball in hell.

But one move which will certainly have positive results is be to launch a highway patrol division of the police. This would comprise high-powered cars, in a highly visible livery, equipped with properly calibrated equipment to check speed and video cameras to record errant driver behaviour.

The mere presence of these vehicles on our roads will cause some drivers to adjust their technique, and others will do so when it is seen how effective the patrol is in putting drivers in court! This would catch bad drivers before accidents, not after. I’d be interested to get your views on ways of reducing accidents and deaths on our roads.

Regards,

Tony Gee

Hello again, Tony. I agree, talking will not solve anything, nor will the abnormally punitive laws that keep coming up. If anything, those laws will only broaden the scope for extortion.

If one risks a three-year or Sh500,000 penalty for what may be, in essence, a “minor” infraction, think of the possibilities. Even the most moral amongst us will start to seriously consider greasing a palm with a promise “not to do it again”.

Your suggestion, by the way, may already be under consideration by the government. Spotted around town is the MG 6 Turbo, in various GK colours, including the blue-and-white patrol livery.

Also spotted was a fleet of Imprezas, again, in police colours. Sadly, these are not STi-spec (for more of my thoughts on this, please check out blog.autobazaar.co.ke).

The powerful police cars, complete with video equipment, would be a powerful deterrent. In town, I’m thinking cameras would also work: those misbehaving within roundabouts or jumping red robots will soon find themselves in an uncomfortable position as they are presented with photographic evidence of themselves caught in the act.

The government revenue from fining these folks would go up, and even more noticeably, bad behaviour on our roads will disappear.

Hi Mr Baraza

I have an ex-UK VW Touareg fitted with an automatic gearbox. On accelerating, as it auto-changes from D3 to D4 or lowers from D4 to D3, there is this heavy jerk that is startling. A local mechanic (ex CMC) reckons I should change the gearbox, but I am not convinced. Actually, I don’t want to! Your diagnosis and treatment please.

Ms Lucy Ciru

That mech is an expert in burying his head in the sand. Gearboxes are not cheap. Have a diagnosis done, but first of all check the level of the ATF. It may be too low (or too high). Also, first-generation Touaregs had unrefined, slow-thinking gearboxes, and so it could be that the jerking is one of those characteristics that defined the car at the time.

Dear Baraza,

Thanks for helping us grow our knowledge and understanding of cars. I am trying to make a decision between two car models: a Subaru Forester and a VW Golf station wagon, both 2005 versions.

How would you compare the two using the following parametres: ground clearance, general and off-road handling, stability, performance , ‘hotness’ and resale value? And which of the two would you go for?

Clearance: The Forester wins.General handling: I’d still say the Forester. However, if the Golf was hatchback…

Of-road handling: No contest. Forester.

Stability: Hard to call. The Golf has a lower ride height, but the Forester is set up in the fashion of the Impreza, and it has 4WD to boot, so…. Forester?

Performance: Forester. Especially if it has the letters “STi” attached to the rest of the name.

‘Hotness’: This is relative. Your opinion matters here to you more than mine does.

Resale value: Take a guess. Yes, you are right. Forester again. Kenyans are scared of European cars, and oddly enough, they also love Foresters, so reselling one would never pose a problem.

My pick: Ahem… drum roll… and the winner is… the Forester. Especially if it has the letters “STi” attached to the rest of the name.

Hi Baraza,Thank for your informative articles on motoring, which you do with a touch of wry humour. About three or four years ago there were reports on BBC radio that police were investigating the sale of counterfeit Ferraris in Italy. Please let me know :

1. How these counterfeits compare to the genuine article in terms of specifications, performance and availability of spare parts.

2. Whether there is a big market to sustain such an enterprise.

3. If it is legal to own such vehicles.

Regards.

1. I have no idea. I have never owned or driven a Ferrari; real or fake. I once owned a Ferrari toy though….

2. Maybe in China. And maybe Kenya too (we have to admit, Kenyans have a taste for fake stuff. I, for one, own a fake Breitling watch. I realised it was fake because it cannot summon a helicopter, but apparently the real thing can…)

3. I don’t know. I think local laws would apply (they might be legal in China. And maybe Kenya. But they are definitely illegal in Italy).

Hello Baraza,

I applaud you for your good work! I’m happy to tell you that I have accumulated enough savings to purchase an eight-year-old car. However, I can’t make a choice between a Toyota Premio 1800cc and a Toyota Avensis 1800cc. Therefore, kindly enlighten me on the following issues between the two species of Toyota.

1. Which one supersedes the other in terms of versatility?

2. Which one supersedes the other in terms of fuel efficiency?

3. Why is the Avensis not as common as the Premio?

4. I have seen some manual-gearbox Avensis’ but not any manual Premio. Why is this so yet they come from the same Kingdom?

5. Which of the two is stable at high speed when all other things are held constant?

I hope your answers will not polarise the customers of either species lest you be accused of bias.Regards,

Peter Waweru

1. None

2. None

3. The Avensis was sold in small numbers new, from Toyota Kenya. The used Avensis being imported are mostly ex-UK (where they are exclusively assembled). The Premios are mostly ex-Japan (where they are also exclusively assembled). More imported cars come from Japan than the UK, so there.

4. Actually they don’t come from the same Kingdom. As pointed out in 3 above, the Avensis is assembled in the UK and has a European target market. The Premio is a JDM car. Market forces/dynamics and vehicle classification led Toyota into deciding that the Premio will be auto-only, while the Avensis would have the option of a manual gearbox.

5. They are the same.

Hi Baraza,

While I have no reservations about the performance of the Subaru Outback, kindly help me clarify one or two issues:

1. How is the fuel consumption of the car in comparison with the Toyota Premio 1800cc, which I own?

2. I am a moderate-speed driver with an average income of Sh250,000. Do you think I can maintain the Outback comfortably? I am a family man with two daughters and I don’t drink or go partying.

3. Are the spare parts for the Outback expensive?

The Premio has been wonderful so far but I am in love with heavy cars not exceeding 2500cc. Also, if you were to choose between Toyota Mark X and the Outback, which one would you go for?

Regards,

James.

1. The fuel consumption is definitely much higher in the Outback than in the Premio (I want to add duhhh… at this point).

2. Ahem… I really can’t answer that. I don’t know your priorities, or your budgetary allocations for the basic needs and wants of your family. And to be honest, I’d rather not know. That is personal information. Only you can decide whether or not keeping the Outback will bankrupt you.

3. A little bit more, compared to the Premio.

Between the Mark X and the Outback I’d go for the Mark X. But one with 3,000cc and a supercharger (316 bhp)

Hi Baraza,

Great column, Sir! Just read your piece stating that you want to supercharge a Carina. ’Been considering turbo- or super-charging a 1992 Corrolla AE 100 but was held back by the many modifications I would have to do to the engine for it not to fall apart, and to the brakes and suspension (guessing would need stiffer suspension). ’Curious, therefore, to know:

1. Where I can get a super-charger or turbo-charger compatible with a Toyota engine.

2. What mods I would have make to the engine (guessing air intakes, fuel pump, engine block and pistons, heads, valves etc); the suspension stiffer and responsive, the transmission, and the brakes (I prefer ventilated discs, rear and front). Please be specific on brands and cost, if known.

3. Which garage should I use? Most guys I speak to don’t have the faintest idea how to go about it.

4. The overall costing.

5. Would nitrous be a better option? What is the resultant power and cost implications? What garages, if any, can do a proper job? I did consider just buying a stock Starlet GT engine, but feared  compatibility and performance issues (AE 100 is much heavier), or getting a trubo Subaru Forester engine and plugging it into the AE 100, but then again compatibility cropped up. Although it would be a labour of love for me, the logistics (getting products and reliable garage) and costs (might just be cheaper and more reliable buying a WRX) have made me reconsider. So I’m quite curious to what you have in mind and how you would go about it.

BTW: On the V8 Land Rover, I have a friend who just bought a 500hp 6.4 litre Ford F150 Raptor and he has been going on about it. It sounds like a good idea and a much simpler project to mount a V8 on a 4×4, although you could just buy a V8 Land Rover or Range Rover and avoid the headache. Thanks, and sorry for the long mail.

PH (Petrol Head) Nzoka.

Nzoka, actually, it’s an Allion that I want to supercharge, not the Carina. Anywho:

1. Toyota Racing Development (commonly known as TRD). Either that or get one from someone else. I may know one or two people who want to get rid of their TRD superchargers (if they haven’t already done so)
2. That is one long list you are requesting there, and requires a bit of research. I haven’t come up with a proper check list of all the mods I intend to do, mostly because I don’t have the Allion to start with (or the money to supercharge it). But it is a serious plan. I will let you know once I embark on it.

3. I will use The Paji’s garage (Auto Art K Ltd). He does this kind of thing all the time, and I want to abuse my friendship to pay less (or nothing) for the work.

4. See 2. And 3. Mostly 2…

5. I really abhor the use of nitrous injection, so if and when I start modding an Allion, I will eschew that line of tuning. Power implications are heavily dependent on set up (dry shot, wet shot or direct port), while cost implications will be bad for anybody who depends on you for survival.

It will burn a huge hole in your pocket, and your cylinder head if not done properly. Garage? Auto Art. Or Unity Auto Garage, somewhere near Auto Art.

That friend with the Raptor: Where does he drive it? I’m curious. Stay in touch for the time when I start the modification. It may not necessarily be an Allion, but I definitely want to modify an NA engine with a supercharger, just to see the effects (turbos have been done by many, I want something unusual)

Posted on

The Avensis is just another bland Toyota

Hi Baraza,

I have shipped in a Toyota Avensis from the UK and have been told of certain concerns regarding the car:

1. That parts are not locally available; I will have to get some spares, such as suspensions and ball joints, from Dubai.

2. That body parts can only be found upon placing a special order to the auto spares dealer shops along Kirinyaga Road. Are these concerns real?

Also, please comment on the performance, maintenance, as well as the merits and demerits. It is a 1.8-litre automatic model.

John

1. Visit Toyota Kenya and ask if they have the parts you seek. They sold the car under franchise, they should be able to offer support for that model.

2. I repeat, visit Toyota Kenya and ask.

The performance of this car is not exciting, maintenance is typical of pseudo-executive Toyota saloons and, being a Toyota, it is hard to come up with legitimate demerits without resorting to nit-picking.

Also, being a Toyota from the early 21st century, it is hard to come up with particular strong points that stand out versus other vehicles (maybe fuel economy in the D4-D diesel version).

In other words, it is just another bland Toyota that will do everything a family saloon is supposed to. That is why I have never reviewed it; there is nothing to say without boring the hell out of my readers.

**************

Hi Baraza,

What is the difference between a restricted and unrestricted exhaust system in a car and how do the systems affect performance and fuel consumption?

Also, what are the pros and cons of low-profile tyres? Do they make a car more stable as compared to the “normal” tyres?

Restricted exhausts are what you would find in any normal car, complete with catalytic converters, back boxes, silencers and such.

Unrestricted exhausts have all these removed and are just one straight pipe from manifold to tip (hence the name straight-thru exhaust), which, more often than not, is of a larger diameter than stock (factory spec).

The effect is to improve performance, but you will not make your car faster by removing the silencer and the cat, you also have to map the ECU, in effect telling the engine that there is lower back pressure as compared to before, so adjust your timing accordingly.

Also, the real purpose of straight-thru exhaust comes after engine modifications are done; such modifications will make the engine rev higher, faster and with greater volume/mass of intake charge/exhaust products, such as by forced induction or using bigger and highly polished intakes.

The exhaust is rarely, if ever, Step 1 in making a car go faster.

About low-profile tyres; Pros: better handling since most low-profile tyres are also wide-section and offer better grip. Also, the thinner side walls are stiffer and so reduce body roll and the tendency to flip over.

Cons: They are expensive, and they make the car uncomfortable. They also are unsuitable for less-than-perfect road conditions as the impact from constant bumping makes them swell.

**************

JM,

What would be your advice in regard to driving on roads that have been damaged by heavy trailers such as the section near Eldoret?

Is there any damage to the wheels/suspension if one drives on the raised “rails” now that this seems to be the only way out for low cars (else their under-carriage will scrape the road)?

I know the place you are referring to: not too far from the Equator crossing and just next to the turn-off into Kapsabet, right?

The trick is to keep the tyres on either side of the car on top of the bumps (or “rails” as you call them).

Avoid slipping into the troughs as you might bend your steering arms, scrape off the sump or even knock out the diff in a rear-drive car if it is low enough. Keep your speed low to guarantee control and avoid skidding under hard braking (downhill plus slippery road surface).

**************

Baraza,

I previously owned a Toyota 110 but recently disposed of it. I now want to buy another car and, owing to the market prices, I have decided to go for a Subaru Impreza.

I would like to know the consumption of this car verses Toyotas of the same engine capacity (1500cc) and why people don’t like Subarus as much as they do Toyotas.

Njoroge.

The fuel economy figures for Subarus and Toyotas should not be too disparate, if we keep turbos out of the picture.

The Subs may be a touch thirstier owing to the AWD transmission, but this is not something you cannot recover with a little common sense.

After all, Subarus are built and developed by Toyota (in a way).

The disregard for Subaru cars stems from several avenues.

First, are the turbocharged versions; they are thirsty, especially when pushed, so people generally assume (after buying the wrong Subaru once) that all Subs are dipsomaniacs.

Second, is the STi clique, the Impreza WRX fan club.

While not all of them exhibit anti-social behaviour on the roads, there are one or two bad cards that will overtake you while driving on the pavement or wake you up at 3am as they pass outside your bedroom window in a car equipped with an aftermarket exhaust system and ALS (anti-lag system), sounding like a small army is invading your neighbourhood with automatic weapons.

But they are not all evil, sleep-depriving, rule-flouting louts in the STi club. Just as not all Subarus are turbocharged, and so not all will deplete your disposable income. Feel free to get an Impreza, even an STi if you are up to the task, but please don’t drive like an idiot.

**************

JM,

My friend and I are re-engineering the petrol engine of a saloon car so that it uses hydrogen; don’t be bewildered, great inventions come from mundane ideas.

We have built a hydrogen cell that uses water and electric current to produce hydrogen. The hydrogen, we presume, can be combusted to produce the driving power to the pistons. The hydrogen cell is already working and the hydrogen being produced is igniting.

Now, what are the challenges we may face in using hydrogen as a fuel? By the way, hydrogen burns at much lower temperatures than fossil fuels, and the by-product is water only, so we save on the environment. Do you think we are headed anywhere?

I hope we live through the process to enjoy the car. If we succeed, we will bring you the car for a road test… if the oil multinationals don’t smoke us out.

Harold.

You have managed to isolate hydrogen gas from water? At what cost?

Anyway, I am glad the cell is working, and yes, hydrogen does combust (with a “pop” sound, according to our Chemistry teachers; in reality, it burns with a loud bang/explosion, as the operators of air-ships will tearfully testify). The question is: how does it burn in the engine?

How are you storing it in the car? What injection system will you use? Will it have to be first liquefied? Have you studied the combustion properties of hydrogen? This will assist in variable valve timing and direct injection.

What of additives? If the by-product is water (which it is), and there is a bit of blow-by in the cylinders (which there will be), water will get into the sump and mix with the oil, forming sludge.

Exhaust gas re-circulation? Will you re-circulate steam into the engine? How much energy will the combustion process release? If the explosion is too violent, how will you control it? Is there stratified intake charge combustion? Will the engine block and heads need bolstering to prevent pre-mature failures?

I am not watering down your hard work, these are just guidelines on areas to pay attention to. You may be on to something here, who knows?

What you need is funding for feasibility studies of your project, because I have not even started on infrastructure: plants and factories for extracting hydrogen, storage facilities, dispensers…

**************

Hi Baraza,

I am a physically challenged person (paraplegic) who is planning to buy a second-hand car. My budget is between Sh300,000 and Sh400,000. Kindly advice on the following:

1. Type i.e. Toyota, Nissan, etc.

2. To import or buy locally assembled.

3. If it is to import, the right/proper procedure of doing it. Please note that I am tax-exempted.

4. Where can I learn to drive the same?

Mwangi.

1. This mostly depends on personal taste, though for that kind of money, a Nissan may be a better bet. The demand for Toyotas rarely wanes, so getting a good one that cheap is not easy.

2. For reliability, a locally assembled version is the smarter choice. Also, the car can be modified for use by paraplegics by the same people who sold it.

3. I have never known the exact procedure that will ensure you get the car you want without risking theft, fraud or short-selling.

4. The AA, or any reputable driving school, should be able to help you out. First of all, the car has to be modified to transfer the foot controls (pedals and parking for some models) from the floor and site them within arms reach. From there, it is just practice.

I know of someone who has had his Caldina modified with a “foot-free” kit, so to speak. He, like you, is paraplegic.

**************

Hi JM,

Thanks for your article on the Scania (DN2, July 25, 2012). I have driven the Scania 380 once and for sure it’s a good machine. I would like you to help me out on these two questions:

1. What brings about the “big” difference in speed between the Scania and the Mercedes Actros? That is, the Scania outdoes the Benz when climbing a hill, but when cruising on flat/level ground, the Scania is outdone.

2. Why do truck drivers raise the wheels that are just before the rear driving wheels. That is, those that have no torque?

1. The amazing climbing power comes from the incredible torque that the engine develops (about 2500 Nm in the R420).

This torque in itself comes from the turbocharger, intercooler, intelligent engine programming, and of course the turbocompound setup, which acts as a complement to the turbocharger (it increases the speed of exhaust gases going through the exhaust turbine in the turbo).

The lower speed on flat ground stems from the fact that Scanias are programmed (and built) to last and offer good performance (in lugging loads) while returning good fuel economy, so their close-ratio gearboxes are not engineered for outright top speed.

The presence of a retarder along the drive-line also makes high speeds hard to achieve. And lastly, they come fitted with speed governors.

2. The raising of the tag axle (that is what it is called) is sometimes automatic, when the vehicle senses the load does not warrant the use of the extra axle.

It can also be raised manually, if the vehicle is so equipped.

It is usually raised to save the tyres: if the tag axle is not needed, you can save tyres (and money) by getting the two tyres off the ground, at which point they are essentially spare wheels.

Posted on

If you’re determined, you can achieve 1 kpl in a Forester

Hi Baraza,
Kindly educate me on the following issues:

1. What is the consumption of the Subaru Forester when driving in a normal manner and when driving like you want to fly?

2. What is the cost of the new model of the Volkswagen Passat and can I get a second-hand one?

3. Which among the following has a higher fuel consumption rate? A 3000cc BMW X5, 2200cc BMW 530i, 2000cc Subaru Forester, 2700cc Prado and a 2000cc VW Passat, all with petrol engines.

4. What is the cost of a good motorbike with an 800cc engine?
Paul
—————————-

1. Is the Forester turbocharged or not? I know if you drive like a nun, you will manage maybe 11 kpl in town, provided you don’t end up in the sort of gridlock that we find ourselves in when the president is driving past at that particular moment.

If you are feeling particularly unwise, you can clock a record 1 kpl by driving in first gear only, bouncing off the rev limiter all the while.

Not only will you set new records in noise emission and fuel consumption, but you will also have a blown engine to show for your efforts at the end of the day.

2. The new Passat should cost something north of Sh4.5 million, which is roughly what all its rivals cost (the Toyota Camry 2012 leads the pack in absurdity, costing a scarcely believable Sh8 million).

The Passat’s price could be as high as 6 million though, it mostly depends on spec levels and engine size. As to whether or not one can get one second-hand… it depends. If someone out there is selling his already, then yes, there is a second-hand Passat for sale.

3. The Prado. Its off-road orientation and higher coefficient of drag compared to the X5 means it is hardest on fuel, especially with that 2.7 power unit. The rest are small road-biased passenger cars with small engines, so they can be safely left out of the argument.

4. No idea. I am not a huge fan of two-wheeled transport solutions, except my own God-given setup (my legs, in case you are wondering), but a bike fanatic I am acquainted with tells me they start at about Sh900,000 and work upwards into the millions.

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Baraza,

I am newly employed and I’m planning to get a car to fit the following requirements:

1. A price range of up to 800k.
2. Good clearance.
3. Good fuel consumption.
4. Preferably a seven-seater.
I have been eyeing the Toyota Avanza, but it looks a bit unstable. What do you think?
Any other suggestions?
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Well, the Avanza does not inspire confidence on some fronts, the stability being one. The other is the 1.5-litre engine. I am not a fan of small engines in big vehicles (but the converse works well for me).

How about a mainstream cross-over, but used; the usual RAV-4s and X-Trails and Foresters? How often will you carry seven passengers?

Most seven-seaters are either Prados, Pajeros, Land Rovers (all out of the price range) or family vans (with no ground clearance).

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Baraza,
I want to know how I can increase ground clearance without affecting the safety of the car. I have gone round asking how best I can do this and I have been offered the following recommendations

1. Add spacers.
2. Get a bigger rim.
3. Fit the car with larger profile tyres.
4. Fit Rob Magic coil springs. This was suggested by an auto engineer but I need to compare notes.

I am tempted to fit the springs as well as increase my tyre profile since this is an imported car.

In case you are wondering why I have to do this; coming from shags I am often forced by my mother to carry vegetables and cereals for my family and the road there is rough. What’s your take?
Muteti
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I cannot vouch for option 4 because this calls for a comparison against its competition, which I have not done yet.

You could adopt option 1, but then you will have to be very careful around corners, especially if you drive fast.

You could also go for option 2, but remember bigger rims could mean low-profile tyres, so your wheels and ground clearance are still the same size, the difference now being that your car looks good, the belly still scrapes the ground and your tyre bills threaten to break up your family. So combine two and three, though the stability thing will still be an issue.

Or you could do what I always tell my readers: buy the most appropriate car for your needs. No need to buy a small saloon car if you trade in potatoes and cabbages at a far-off market centre, or buy a nine-seater van to drive yourself to the office daily.

Get a cross-over if ground clearance is an issue in the areas you frequent.
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JM,
I recently bought a second-hand Mitsubishi Gallant (1999 model) with a GDI engine. I then replaced the battery and serviced the car.

I have not encountered any other problems so far. What I want to know is, what is a GDI engine?

Secondly, I have heard that there were some issues with this particular make and that’s why they are not very common in Kenya, is this true? What are the pros and cons of this car?
Osiro
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GDI stands fore gasoline direct injection. It is a technology similar to Toyota’s D4, in that fuel is fed directly into the cylinder, in the fashion of a diesel engine, rather than into the intake manifold as was usual with petrol engines in times past.

It is supposed to improve performance and economy by optimising combustion efficiency and the injection timing. The Galant cars were specified to run on Mobil 1 engine oil, which is a high performance grade of lubricant.

Lesser oil grades tended to, well, degrade the engine, especially for those who imported JDM models. Also, splashing about in puddles was not a good idea, because water got into the electronics fairly easily, the worst culprits being the ECU and throttle electronics system, which then resulted in the throttle being jammed wide open (engine revs on its own).

All the same, the Galant was a very fine car: a good looker, a sublime handler and a convincing performer. The rare VR4 was even considered a watered down Lancer Evolution for the less-than-hardcore, because it had a twin-turbocharged and intercooled 2.5-litre engine good for 280hp and 4WD.
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Baraza,
I intend to acquire my first car and I am torn between a Honda Airwave and a VW Touran. The Airwave is 1500cc, a five-seater and has four airbags. The Touran is 1600cc, a seven-seater and has eight airbags.

Please advice me on the vehicles’ reliability and the availability of spare parts for each. I love power and reasonable speed; if you were in my shoes, which one would you go for?
Raphael
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Go for the Touran. From your own description it offers more stuff, that is, airbags and seats. Hondas are legendarily reliable, while VW are legendarily well built.

The Touran’s spares may or not may be available at CMC: if they are not, you may have to shop around.

The Honda franchise is still not very well grounded in the country but rumour has it that our Far Eastern car-making compadres might be opening a fully-fledged showroom soon.
So the Touran it is, for now.
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Dear Baraza,
I have a 2003 model Toyota Land Cruiser Amazon 100 series which has one worrying issue: when I shift the gear (automatic) from R to D fast, there is a small bang, and the same is heard, though rarely, when the gears are shifting while driving. In slow shifts, there is no sound.

Several mechanics have tried to diagnose the fault but all have concluded that its mechanical rather than electrical.

We have checked the propeller, front and rear diffs and gearbox, but most mechanics say its the transfer box (case).

They all also said that since the sound is very low and rare, we don’t need to bring it down unless the sound becomes louder and driving comfort is compromised.

Since the transfer case is purely mechanical, can it be opened to replace faulty parts or is it a must that I buy a new one?

About how much does a new transfer case cost, or are am I supposed to but a complete gearbox? Lastly, are there other known problems with this model?
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I find it unlikely that it is the transfer case because the Amazon is full-time 4WD. Unless you were shifting between low range and high range, I don’t see how the transfer case could be the culprit. I still suspect the primary gearbox.

Seeing how it is an automatic, maybe the ATF levels are low, otherwise, the issue could be in the programming of the gearbox settings (clutch operation and gear changes are out of sync at some engine/road speeds, so there is shift shock, which is the bang you experience).

Just in case it is the transfer case, it is reparable, but I would not be too excited about the bill that will follow. It will be better than a new transfer case though. The 100, otherwise, is not a bad car.
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Hi Baraza,
I am interested in a Suzuki Escudo, 2005 model. Kindly enlighten me on the following:
1. What size is engine J20A in terms of cc?
2. Does this kind of an engine have any serious problems?
3. What fuel system does it use; VVT-i, EFI or carburettor?
4. Kindly compare it with the RAV-4 in terms of consumption.
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1. The engine capacity is 1,995cc, easily rounded off as 2,000cc.
2. None that I know of so far.
3. It uses EFI. To get VVT, you have to opt for the newer, and larger engines (2.4 and 3.0).
4. The Suzuki is thirstier, but how you drive it really matters.
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Hi Baraza,
I roll in an old model Toyota Starlet. Sometimes, when I step on the clutch, it makes some roaring sound like that of the engine, but after sometime, this goes away. What could be the problem? Also, offer advise on small machines every now and then in your column.
Leah
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That roaring noise that sounds like the engine actually is the engine. The noise comes from the revs flaring since the load of the drive-train components (shafts, gears, dog clutches, etc) has been taken off, so the engine does not have to put in extra effort just to keep turning.

Your idle settings must be messed up, which is why the revs flare like that when the clutch is disengaged. Either that or you should take your foot off the throttle any time when clutching in.

I address all cars, big and small. If you have read this column long enough, you might remember an era of Demios, Vitzes, Duets, iSTs, Micras, Colts and other similar pint-sized fare.
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Baraza,
I am buying an ex-Japan Chevrolet LT Optra station wagon 2005 model. Please advise whether this is be a good option considering it’s not a common car around.

Also, what does DOHC and supercharged mean in terms of efficiency, fuel consumption and reliability? Someone told me that its a pretty fast car but also heavy, so handling is not a problem, is this correct?

Does the supercharger need any care? Do I need to install a timer?
Sam
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The Optra was part of GM’s lineup not too long ago, so they should have an idea about how to maintain one. DOHC means double overhead Camshafts, and supercharging is a means of forced induction by use of engine power.

Both are an enemy of reliability because they add more moving parts to the engine, so there is a wider scope for things to go wrong.

Supercharging also is an enemy of fuel economy, because the reason we supercharge cars is to make them faster (and thus harder on fuel).

The DOHC could improve efficiency somewhat, but not enough to counteract the thirst occasioned by the blower.

Superchargers, unlike turbos, do not need special care as such, but just be careful to keep the kit well lubricated.

One last thing. Weight is an enemy of handling, not a friend. People mistake stability at speed for handling.

A heavy car will sit well on the road at 300 km/h, sure, but show it a few corners and understeer will be your lot.
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Hi Baraza,
1. I drive a Toyota Mark II Grande. My wife thinks that apart from the spacious interior, there is nothing much in this car compared to a Premio and an Allion.

But I feel the Mark II is stable and the engine performance (Beams 2000) is superior and better than what’s in the Allion and the Premio.

How does the Mark II compare to the two when it comes to stability and engine performance? How would you rate it against an Avensis?

2. Is it true that some Mercedes service parts (filters, plugs, pads) can fit in the Mark II?

3. I want to upgrade and I am considering a Mark X, a Mercedes C 200 or 220 or a Volvo S80. I am more inclined towards the Volvo because I feel the other two have become clichés and I don’t like going with the crowd.

So how does the S80 compare with the others in terms of maintenance, engine efficiency, safety, durability, speed, stability on the road, interior and extra features (cruise control, sensors etc)?
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1. The Mark II outruns them all, including the Avensis. If your wife does not buy our allegation, introduce her to the 2.5-litre 6-cylinder Mark II. Then she will see our point.

2. I find that unlikely. What the person probably meant was that universal spares can go into either a Mark II or a Benz.

If genuine Benz parts could fit in a Mark II, then the converse would be true too: Toyota parts would be applicable in a Benz. And that, in motoring language, is heresy.

3. Smart choice. And don’t worry about repairs or parts, there is a Volvo showroom right next to the Peugeot showroom somewhere near Koinange Street.